September 2000 Executions
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Three killers were executed in the month of August 2000. They had murdered at least 5 people.
Two killers were issued stays of execution. They have murdered at least 3 people.

Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
September 12, 2000 Ohio Dallas Green, 19
Ryan Stoffer, 21 
Michael Scott stayed

On August 24, 1999, Michael Dean Scott shot and killed Dallas Green, a 19-year-old Canton man over a perceived insult and on September 12, 1999 shot and killed a 21-year-old man, Ryan Stoffer, while test-driving the man's car, which he was trying to sell. Scott confessed to the murders on audio tape during the police investigations. There are still appeals pending and the execution is not likely to take place on this date.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
September 13, 2000 Texas John G. Ebbert  Miguel Richardson stayed

Oklahoma native Miguel Richardson was on the run for more than a year after the 3/31/79 robbery and slayings of two security guards at a San Antonio area Holiday Inn. Ebbert and the second victim were investigating a complaint from a motel guest when they found Richardson attempting to break into a room. As they were escorting him to the office, a gun that had been concealed in his waistband fell to the floor. He grabbed the gun and held the guards at gunpoint. He handcuffed one of them, took their money and then shot them both. He was not arrested until 6/80 in Denver Colorado.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
September 13, 2000 Missouri Stanley "Hank" Willoughby George Bernard Harris executed

George Bernard "Baby" Harris won some money shooting craps on the morning of March 11, 1989. A man who needed money asked Harris to let him "pawn" two machine guns, an Uzi and a .45 caliber Thompson automatic machine gun. Harris agreed, gave the man $500 in return for the machine guns and took them to the trunk of his car. Harris walked back toward the crap game, worried that someone would steal the guns from his car. He asked a friend, Michael Taylor, if he would keep the machine guns for him. When Taylor agreed, Harris followed Taylor to Taylor's house with several other men, including Stanley "Hank" Willoughby. When Harris arrived, Taylor asked Willoughby to come down to Harris' car. Harris spoke to Willoughby, removed a box containing the machine guns from the trunk and handed it to Willoughby. Willoughby walked toward the house with the weapons. Another man, who was sitting on the porch, asked Willoughby not to bring the guns in the house. Willoughby handed the box containing the machine guns to Michael Taylor's younger brothers. Willoughby told the boys to hide the guns somewhere near the house. Harris left. The boys took the box from Willoughby and hid it under some bushes in the backyard. The young Taylors left without telling Willoughby where they hid the guns. At about 8:00 p.m., Harris returned looking for Michael Taylor. Someone else answered the door and indicated that Taylor was upstairs sleeping. Harris went upstairs and told Taylor he had come to pick up the guns. When Taylor told him that he did not know where the guns were, Harris insisted that he needed them right away. At some point during the day Harris had been called a "punk" and told Taylor that he was going to do a "drive-by" shooting to show "them" that he was not a punk. Taylor told Harris to ask Willoughby about the machine guns when Willoughby returned from "picking up some girls." Harris went downstairs. Taylor stayed in bed. Some time later, Harris yelled for Michael Taylor to come downstairs. When Taylor came down, he found Harris, Willoughby and several other people downstairs. Harris asked Taylor for his guns. Taylor again told Harris to ask Willoughby. Willoughby explained that he did not know where the guns were because Taylor's brothers had hidden them. Harris insisted that he wanted his guns and that he wanted them now. Willoughby went outside to look for the guns. Harris was heard to say, "I'm going to kill that n****r." Four of the other people in the house went upstairs. Five minutes later, Willoughby returned without the guns and another man left to look for them. At this point, Michael Taylor, Hank Willoughby and another man were the only three people remaining on the living room area. Willoughby told Harris that if he wanted his guns, he would have to wait until the brothers came back. Harris insisted on getting his guns right away. Willoughby said, "Well, I can't help you." Harris got up from the chair and pulled a .41 caliber Rugar Blackhawk magnum revolver from his waistband, and shot the victim in the lower face and neck. The bullet passed through Willoughby's carotid artery. Willoughby staggered next door to Michael Taylor's house and collapsed on the steps. A few minutes later, the police and ambulance were called. Meanwhile, the other man who had gone out to look for them returned with the guns and placed them on the porch and ran inside. Harris took the guns and drove away, ultimately making his way to a female friend's apartment. From there, Harris and his friend went to the Champagne Lounge looking for a man named "Rudi". Harris told her he intended to kill Rudi and had bought the machine guns for that purpose. Willoughby died before he reached the hospital. Law enforcement arrested Harris in Columbia, Missouri on March 15, 1989, after Harris and others had committed an armed robbery there. 

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
September 14, 2000 Virginia Sarah Wisnosky Derek Barnabei executed

An execution date has been set for Derek R. Barnabei, who was convicted of raping and murdering Old Dominion University student Sarah Wisnosky almost seven years ago. Circuit Judge Charles E. Poston ordered that Barnabei will be put to death on Sept. 14. Barnabei's lawyers continue to appeal the capital murder conviction. They have called for a new trial based, in part, on incomplete DNA testing of crime-scene evidence before the trial. Much of Barnabei's efforts have focused on blood discovered under Sarah's fingernails, which was never tested for DNA identification. Prosecutors argued they did not need the additional evidence tested to prove Barnabei's guilt. But Barnabei's attorneys said the testing may well implicate another suspect in the murder. A request for more DNA testing was also mailed to Gov. Jim Gilmore according to one of Barnabei's attorneys. Barnabei also intends to appeal his case to the U.S. Supreme Court. On Sept. 22, 1993, Sarah's nude body was found in the Lafayette River. The 17-year-old freshman from Lynchburg had been strangled and suffered 10 blows to the head from what appeared to be a ball-peen hammer. Barnabei, who had been dating Wisnosky, fled to Ohio. Barnabei, who denied the charges, was convicted of capital murder and rape in 1995. Stains matching Sarah's blood type were found in Barnabei's room, prosecutors said. Prosecutors presented forensics evidence that semen matching Barnabei's was present in Sarah's body. Barnabei's attorneys said the evidence was only consistent with a consensual relationship. UPDATE: DNA test results on blood under Sarah's fingernails confirmed Barnabei's guilt. The blood belonged to both Sarah and Barnabei.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
September 27, 2000 Texas Stephanie Rae Flannery, 12
Christi Jo Egger, 19
Sherri Newman, 12
Ricky McGinn executed

Ricky McGinn was sentenced to die for the rape and murder of his 12-year-old step-daughter, Stephanie Rae Flanary. On the morning of May 22, 1993, Janet McGinn, Ricky Nolen McGinn's wife, left her home in Brownwood, Texas for a trip to Arlington. She left her 12-year-old daughter, Stephanie Flanary, in the care of McGinn. McGinn and Stephanie spent the day alone together. On May 22, 1993, he reported his stepdaughter missing from their rural home after she supposedly went for an evening walk. Brown County sheriff's deputies arrested him the next day when they found a large quantity of blood in the hatchback portion of his car. McGinn - whom investigators consider a suspect in 2 other bludgeoning killings - told authorities the blood must have come from fish that he and his stepdaughter had caught. Two days later, Stephanie Flanary's battered body was found in a culvert, although a witness testified it wasn't there when McGinn was arrested. Deputies didn't find a bloody roofer's ax in McGinn's disabled pickup until 4 days after the girl disappeared, despite having looked in the truck several times. A videotape shot by investigators showed a deputy reaching under the driver's seat and picking up the ax with a bare hand. McGinn's fingerprints were not found on the foot-long tool. Stephanie was sexually assaulted and then beaten in the head with the blunt side of an ax. She died of multiple head injuries and a fractured skull. Forensic tests identified the blood on the ax and some of the blood in the car as Stephanie's. Her autopsy revealed contusions to her genitals. DNA tests were inconclusive on a pubic hair that allegedly came from her attacker, and DNA could not be recovered from a semen stain on her clothing. But the prosecutor successfully argued that McGinn, who was acquitted of killing a man in the 1980s, killed Stephanie during a rape, making it a capital crime. The hair's microscopic characteristics were "identical" to McGinn's, and serological tests matched the semen to him with more than a 90% likelihood, prosecutor Lee Haney said. There has been further DNA testing related to McGinn. His DNA recently was identified in semen recovered from 1992 murder victim Christy Jo Egger, 19, Mr. Haney said. But because the 2 once dated, any prosecution would require more evidence, he said. "If Congress or the Legislature wants to change the law so that we decide this by DNA testing instead of the judicial process, that's up to them," Mr. Haney said of the McGinn case. "But we have all these laws and safeguards for a defendant that have been scrupulously observed in this case, and I believe enough has been done.
More than enough."

 

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