May 2006 Executions
Home Up Info & Resources Death Penalty Issues Death Penalty Links Articles of Interest News & Polls Death Penalty Paper Books & Tapes Legislation Table of Contents Search the Site Discussion

 

Back
Up
Next

Four killers were executed in May 2006.  They had murdered at least 7 people.
Eight
killers were given a stay in May 2006.  They have murdered at least 18 people.

Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 2, 2006   Ohio David A. Manning
Donald Harris, 21
Joseph Clark executed 

On the night of January 13, 1984, David A. Manning, an employee of a Clark service station in Toledo, was shot and killed during an armed robbery. The record indicates that Joseph L. Clark entered the service station at approximately 9:00 pm armed with a drawn .32 caliber revolver. David Manning was working alone and Clark demanded money. According to a statement made by to police, David told Clark that there was no money, but Clark repeated his demand for money. David then walked to the back room of the service station, returned to the counter, handed Clark approximately $60 from the cash drawer and told him that was all of the money on the premises. Clark "told him it wasn't all of it." David responded that there was no more money, but reached down and produced an envelope containing more cash. According to Clark's statement, David then tried to "force his way on me" whereupon Clark shot Manning once in the right upper chest. Clark then ran out the service station door to his car and drove home. Shortly thereafter, two Toledo police officers arrived on the scene in response to a silent alarm. One of the officers walked through the service station without seeing anyone. Upon looking further, he found David slouched behind the service counter. On January 16, 1984, Clark was arrested after allegedly committing an assault and robbery at the Ohio Citizens Bank. The arresting officer found a .32 caliber revolver in Clark’s coat pocket. The next day, Clark, with the assistance of an appointed public defender, was arraigned in the Toledo Municipal Court for the assault and robbery at the bank. The public defender was aware that Clark was a suspect in the Manning murder, and advised Clark not to discuss it with anyone but him. Later that day, the record indicates that Clark tried to hang himself in his jail cell. Consequently, Clark was taken to St. Vincent's Medical Center for examination. On January 23, 1984, Clark was released from the hospital and taken to the Toledo Police Detective Bureau where he was questioned by detectives. Clark first made a statement about a robbery-murder at a Lawson's store in Toledo. Eventually, Clark made a tape-recorded statement confessing to the murder of David Manning. On November 6, 1984, the jury returned a verdict finding Clark guilty of the aggravated murder of Manning while committing aggravated robbery. Joseph L. Clark was sentenced to death for the murder of David Manning and also sentenced to a term of life imprisonment for the Aggravated Murder of Donald Harris. On 1/12/1984, Clark entered the Lawson Store located on Hill Avenue in Toledo, Ohio. He proceeded to jump up onto and over the counter. Clark then removed the cash drawer and money from the safe. During the robbery, Clark shot Donald Harris (age 21) in the back of the head. David was later discovered in a pool of blood behind the counter by two witnesses who had entered the store to make purchases. David was admitted to the Medical College in critical condition and died later from the gunshot wound. An investigation revealed that two black males had been observed waiting in an automobile outside the store, and that a black male was observed inside the store looking around prior to the robbery and shooting. Clark had a lengthy juvenile and adult criminal record, starting at the age of 13. Clark was indicted on a large number of other charges, including other robberies where the victims were shot, but recovered from their wounds.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 4, 2006    Texas Lottie Margaret Rhodes, 5  Jackie Wilson executed 

Lottie Margaret Rhodes was a five-year old kindergarten student who was known as Maggie. On the morning of November 30, 1988, Maggie's body was found face-down on the side of a road in a secluded area of Grand Prairie. A truck driver had spotted her body in the bushes along the street. Her shorts had been pulled down, exposing her buttocks. It was immediately apparent that she had been run over by a car. A further examination revealed that she had been both vaginally and anally raped, strangled, and suffocated. There were tire marks on her body which reflected two distinct tire patterns. A pair of semen-stained panties were found near Maggie's body. Investigators discovered Maggie’s identity when they learned that Maggie, who lived in an apartment complex with her mother, brother, and a live-in baby sitter, had been reportedly abducted from her bedroom the night before. The window in her bedroom had been broken from the outside. Maggie’s mother had gotten up early to be at work by 7 am and had found that Maggie was missing after she noticed a draft in the room. Whoever kidnapped Maggie had put stuffed animals under her covers to make it appear that she was in bed asleep. The babysitter had last checked on Maggie around 2 am. Earlier in the evening, the babysitter had cared for Maggie and her 3-year-old brother while their mother worked at a dinner until about 11:30 pm.  Maggie’s mother had also checked on her daughter before going to bed around midnight. Several pieces of glass recovered from inside and outside Maggie's bedroom had Jackie Wilson’s fingerprints on them. Several witnesses testified that they saw Wilson driving a red spray-painted Mercury Cougar on the night of the murder, and in a statement he gave police, Wilson admitted to driving the car that evening. The two types of tire tracks found on Maggie's body were consistent with the two types of tires on the Cougar. Thirty-eight human hairs, which were found to be microscopically consistent with Maggie's hair, were recovered from the undercarriage of the Cougar, and fibers mixed in with those hairs were consistent with the Cougar's carpet fibers. Nineteen additional hairs were recovered from inside the Cougar, and they were found to be consistent with Maggie's hair. A chest or pubic hair recovered from Maggie's genitalia was consistent with a racial group that includes Hispanics; Wilson is Hispanic. Additional evidence involved a similar crime committed by Wilson the same evening that Maggie was murdered. Namely, an additional complainant from the same apartment complex testified that Wilson broke into her apartment and sexually assaulted her as she slept on the couch. When she awoke, she ordered Wilson to leave. The complainant testified that it appeared that Wilson had entered through a window. He offered her drugs in exchange for sex; declining, she again ordered Wilson to leave, which he did. There was also testimony from several witnesses who saw Wilson drive toward the apartment complex (instead of heading home in the other direction) just before midnight the evening of Maggie's murder. These witnesses further testified that Wilson had been drinking heavily and using cocaine before he departed. When investigators were given Wilson’s name by another child living in the apartment complex, a police officer went to Wilson’s residence to question him. Upon the officer's arrival, Wilson fled. Wilson was identified as a friend of the Rhodes family live in babysitter. Friends and neighbors described Maggie as bright, pretty and outgoing. In 1987, Maggie had been kidnapped by an unknown assailant and released. Then aged 4, she had been found wandering about five miles from her home. She told police that a thin black-haired man about 19 had kidnapped her from outside her apartment in the morning of June 22, 1987. The man released her about an hour later. Medical evidence indicated that Maggie may have been sexually assaulted in the first kidnapping, but police never apprehended the perpetrator in that case. 

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 8, 2006   Virginia (Federal) Douglas Talley
Douglas Moody
Peyton Johnson
Louis Johnson
Torrick Brown
Dorothy Armstrong
Anthony Carter
Bobby Long
Linwood Chiles
Curtis Thorne
Richard Tipton  stayed 

In February 1993, James Roane, Cory Johnson, and Richard Tipton were convicted in the Eastern District of Virginia for an array of criminal activity, including several capital murders, arising out of drug trafficking operations in and near Richmond. Each received at least one death sentence for his crimes, plus various terms of imprisonment. Tipton, Roane, and Cory Johnson were principal "partners" in a substantial drug-trafficking conspiracy that lasted from 1989 through July of 1992. The conspiracy's operations began in Trenton, New Jersey where Johnson and Tipton, both from New York City, became members. In August of 1990, the conspiracy expanded its operations to Richmond, Virginia where Roane joined the conspiracy in November of 1991. The Trenton-based operation came to an end on June 4, 1991 when police confiscated a large quantity of crack cocaine and firearms. In late 1991, the conspiracy's operations were expanded from the Central Gardens area of Richmond to a second area in Richmond called Newtowne. During the period of the conspiracy's operation, its "partners", including appellants, obtained wholesale quantities of powdered cocaine from suppliers in New York City, converted it by "cooking" [it] into crack cocaine, then packaged it, divided it among themselves, and distributed it through a network of 30-40 street level dealers, "workers." Typically, the appellants and their other partners in the conspiracy's operations took two-thirds of the proceeds realized from street-level sales of their product. Over a short span of time in early 1992, Tipton, Cory. Johnson, and Roane were variously implicated in the murders of ten persons within the Richmond area all in relation to their drug-trafficking operation and either because their victims were suspected of treachery or other misfeance, or because they were competitors in the drug trade, or because they had personally offended one of the "partners." On January 4, 1992, Tipton and Roane drove Douglas Talley, an underling in disfavor for mishandling a drug transaction, to the south side of Richmond. Once there, (Roane grabbed Talley from the rear while Tipton stabbed him repeatedly. The attack lasted three to five minutes and involved the infliction of eighty-four stab wounds to Talley's head, neck, and upper body that killed him. On the evening of January 13, 1992, Tipton and Roane went to the apartment of Douglas Moody, a suspected rival in their drug-trafficking area, where Tipton shot Moody twice in the back. After Moody fled by jumping through a window, both Tipton and Roane pursued. Roane, armed with a military-style knife retrieved from an apartment where the knife was kept for co-conspirator Curtis Thorne, caught up with Moody in the front yard of the apartment where he stabbed him eighteen times, killing him. On the night of January 14, 1992, Roane, Cory Johnson, and a third person retrieved a bag of guns that they had left at an apartment earlier that day. Roane then located Peyton Johnson, another rival drug dealer, at a tavern. Shortly after Roane left the tavern, Cory Johnson entered with another person and fatally shot Peyton Johnson with a semi-automatic weapon. On January 29, 1992, Roane pulled his car around the corner of an alley, got out of the vehicle, approached Louis Johnson, whom Johnson thought had threatened him while acting as bodyguard for a rival dealer, and shot him. Cory Johnson and co-conspirator Lance Thomas then got out of Roane's car and began firing at Louis Johnson. As Louis Johnson lay on the ground, either Cory Johnson or Thomas shot him twice at close range. Louis Johnson died from some or all of these gunshot wounds. On the evening of February 1, 1992, Cory Johnson and Lance Thomas were told that Roane had gone to the apartment of Torrick Brown, with whom Roane had been having trouble. Johnson and Thomas armed themselves with semi-automatic weapons and went to the apartment where they joined Roane outside. The three then knocked on Brown's door and asked his half-sister, Martha McCoy, if Brown was there. She summoned Brown to the door and Cory Johnson, Roane, and Thomas opened fire with semi-automatic weapons, killing Brown and critically wounding McCoy. In late January, 1992, after being threatened by Cory Johnson for not paying for a supply of crack cocaine, Dorothy Armstrong went to live with her brother, Bobby Long. On February 1, Cory Johnson learned from Jerry Gaiters the location of Long's house. Thereafter, Tipton and an unidentified "young fellow" picked up Gaiters and Cory Johnson who were then driven by Tipton to a house where the group obtained a bag of guns. After dropping off the unidentified third party, the group proceeded to Long's house. Upon arriving at Long's house, Cory Johnson and Gaiters got out of the car and approached the house. While Tipton waited in the car, Cory Johnson and Gaiters went to the front door. When Long opened the door, Cory Johnson opened fire, killing both Dorothy Armstrong and Anthony Carter, Bobby Long fled out the front door, but was fatally shot by Cory Johnson in the front yard. In early February 1992, Cory Johnson began to suspect that Linwood Chiles was cooperating with the police. On February 19, 1992, Johnson borrowed Valerie Butler's automobile and arranged to meet with Chiles. That night, Chiles, Curtis Thorne, and sisters Priscilla and Gwen Greene met Cory Johnson and drove off together in Chiles's station wagon. Chiles parked the car in an alley, and Tipton soon drove in behind it in another car, got out, and came up alongside the station wagon. With Tipton standing by, Cory Johnson told Chiles to place his head on the steering wheel and then shot Chiles twice at close range. Additional shots were fired, killing Thorne and critically wounding both of the Greene sisters. The autopsy report indicated that Thorne had been hit by bullets fired from two different directions. Tipton was charged with capital murder for eight of these killings, Talley, Moody, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, and Chiles. Cory Johnson, with seven, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton. Roane, with three, Moody, Louis Johnson and Peyton Johnson. The jury convicted Tipton of six of the eight capital murders with which he was charged under, Talley, Armstrong, Long, Carter, Chiles, and Thorne. One of the other two charges was dismissed, Louis Johnson and the other resulted in acquittal of Moody. Tipton was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute , engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, eight counts of committing acts of violence, the eight killings, in the aid of racketeering activity, two counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking crime, and two counts of possessing cocaine base with intent to distribute. The jury convicted Cory Johnson of all seven of the capital murders with which he was charged under, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, eleven counts of committing acts of violence including the seven killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity , five counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or drug-trafficking offense, and two counts of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute The jury convicted Roane of all three of the capital murders with which he was charged under Moody, Peyton Johnson, and Louis Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, five counts of committing acts of violence including the three killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity, four counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking offense and one count of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute. Following a penalty hearing on the capital murder counts, the jury recommended that Cory Johnson be sentenced to death on all of the seven murders of which he had been convicted; that Tipton be sentenced to death for three of the six murders of which he was convicted Talley, Chiles, and Thorne and that Roane be sentenced to death for one of the three of which he was convicted. Moody. The district court sentenced Johnson, Tipton, and Roane to death in accordance with the jury's recommendations, and imposed various sentences of imprisonment upon each of the appellants for several non-capital counts on which they were convicted and for those capital murder counts on which Tipton and Roane had been convicted but were not given death sentences.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 10, 2006   Virginia (Federal) Douglas Talley
Douglas Moody
Peyton Johnson
Louis Johnson
Torrick Brown
Dorothy Armstrong
Anthony Carter
Bobby Long
Linwood Chiles
Curtis Thorne
Cory Johnson  pending 

In February 1993, James Roane, Cory Johnson, and Richard Tipton were convicted in the Eastern District of Virginia for an array of criminal activity, including several capital murders, arising out of drug trafficking operations in and near Richmond. Each received at least one death sentence for his crimes, plus various terms of imprisonment. Tipton, Roane, and Cory Johnson were principal "partners" in a substantial drug-trafficking conspiracy that lasted from 1989 through July of 1992. The conspiracy's operations began in Trenton, New Jersey where Johnson and Tipton, both from New York City, became members. In August of 1990, the conspiracy expanded its operations to Richmond, Virginia where Roane joined the conspiracy in November of 1991. The Trenton-based operation came to an end on June 4, 1991 when police confiscated a large quantity of crack cocaine and firearms. In late 1991, the conspiracy's operations were expanded from the Central Gardens area of Richmond to a second area in Richmond called Newtowne. During the period of the conspiracy's operation, its "partners", including appellants, obtained wholesale quantities of powdered cocaine from suppliers in New York City, converted it by "cooking" [it] into crack cocaine, then packaged it, divided it among themselves, and distributed it through a network of 30-40 street level dealers, "workers." Typically, the appellants and their other partners in the conspiracy's operations took two-thirds of the proceeds realized from street-level sales of their product. Over a short span of time in early 1992, Tipton, Cory. Johnson, and Roane were variously implicated in the murders of ten persons within the Richmond area all in relation to their drug-trafficking operation and either because their victims were suspected of treachery or other misfeance, or because they were competitors in the drug trade, or because they had personally offended one of the "partners." On January 4, 1992, Tipton and Roane drove Douglas Talley, an underling in disfavor for mishandling a drug transaction, to the south side of Richmond. Once there, (Roane grabbed Talley from the rear while Tipton stabbed him repeatedly. The attack lasted three to five minutes and involved the infliction of eighty-four stab wounds to Talley's head, neck, and upper body that killed him. On the evening of January 13, 1992, Tipton and Roane went to the apartment of Douglas Moody, a suspected rival in their drug-trafficking area, where Tipton shot Moody twice in the back. After Moody fled by jumping through a window, both Tipton and Roane pursued. Roane, armed with a military-style knife retrieved from an apartment where the knife was kept for co-conspirator Curtis Thorne, caught up with Moody in the front yard of the apartment where he stabbed him eighteen times, killing him. On the night of January 14, 1992, Roane, Cory Johnson, and a third person retrieved a bag of guns that they had left at an apartment earlier that day. Roane then located Peyton Johnson, another rival drug dealer, at a tavern. Shortly after Roane left the tavern, Cory Johnson entered with another person and fatally shot Peyton Johnson with a semi-automatic weapon. On January 29, 1992, Roane pulled his car around the corner of an alley, got out of the vehicle, approached Louis Johnson, whom Johnson thought had threatened him while acting as bodyguard for a rival dealer, and shot him. Cory Johnson and co-conspirator Lance Thomas then got out of Roane's car and began firing at Louis Johnson. As Louis Johnson lay on the ground, either Cory Johnson or Thomas shot him twice at close range. Louis Johnson died from some or all of these gunshot wounds. On the evening of February 1, 1992, Cory Johnson and Lance Thomas were told that Roane had gone to the apartment of Torrick Brown, with whom Roane had been having trouble. Johnson and Thomas armed themselves with semi-automatic weapons and went to the apartment where they joined Roane outside. The three then knocked on Brown's door and asked his half-sister, Martha McCoy, if Brown was there. She summoned Brown to the door and Cory Johnson, Roane, and Thomas opened fire with semi-automatic weapons, killing Brown and critically wounding McCoy. In late January, 1992, after being threatened by Cory Johnson for not paying for a supply of crack cocaine, Dorothy Armstrong went to live with her brother, Bobby Long. On February 1, Cory Johnson learned from Jerry Gaiters the location of Long's house. Thereafter, Tipton and an unidentified "young fellow" picked up Gaiters and Cory Johnson who were then driven by Tipton to a house where the group obtained a bag of guns. After dropping off the unidentified third party, the group proceeded to Long's house. Upon arriving at Long's house, Cory Johnson and Gaiters got out of the car and approached the house. While Tipton waited in the car, Cory Johnson and Gaiters went to the front door. When Long opened the door, Cory Johnson opened fire, killing both Dorothy Armstrong and Anthony Carter, Bobby Long fled out the front door, but was fatally shot by Cory Johnson in the front yard. In early February 1992, Cory Johnson began to suspect that Linwood Chiles was cooperating with the police. On February 19, 1992, Johnson borrowed Valerie Butler's automobile and arranged to meet with Chiles. That night, Chiles, Curtis Thorne, and sisters Priscilla and Gwen Greene met Cory Johnson and drove off together in Chiles's station wagon. Chiles parked the car in an alley, and Tipton soon drove in behind it in another car, got out, and came up alongside the station wagon. With Tipton standing by, Cory Johnson told Chiles to place his head on the steering wheel and then shot Chiles twice at close range. Additional shots were fired, killing Thorne and critically wounding both of the Greene sisters. The autopsy report indicated that Thorne had been hit by bullets fired from two different directions. Tipton was charged with capital murder for eight of these killings, Talley, Moody, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, and Chiles. Cory Johnson, with seven, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton. Roane, with three, Moody, Louis Johnson and Peyton Johnson. The jury convicted Tipton of six of the eight capital murders with which he was charged under, Talley, Armstrong, Long, Carter, Chiles, and Thorne. One of the other two charges was dismissed, Louis Johnson and the other resulted in acquittal of Moody. Tipton was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute , engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, eight counts of committing acts of violence, the eight killings, in the aid of racketeering activity, two counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking crime, and two counts of possessing cocaine base with intent to distribute. The jury convicted Cory Johnson of all seven of the capital murders with which he was charged under, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, eleven counts of committing acts of violence including the seven killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity , five counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or drug-trafficking offense, and two counts of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute The jury convicted Roane of all three of the capital murders with which he was charged under Moody, Peyton Johnson, and Louis Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, five counts of committing acts of violence including the three killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity, four counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking offense and one count of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute. Following a penalty hearing on the capital murder counts, the jury recommended that Cory Johnson be sentenced to death on all of the seven murders of which he had been convicted; that Tipton be sentenced to death for three of the six murders of which he was convicted Talley, Chiles, and Thorne and that Roane be sentenced to death for one of the three of which he was convicted. Moody. The district court sentenced Johnson, Tipton, and Roane to death in accordance with the jury's recommendations, and imposed various sentences of imprisonment upon each of the appellants for several non-capital counts on which they were convicted and for those capital murder counts on which Tipton and Roane had been convicted but were not given death sentences.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 12, 2006   Virginia (Federal) Douglas Talley
Douglas Moody
Peyton Johnson
Louis Johnson
Torrick Brown
Dorothy Armstrong
Anthony Carter
Bobby Long
Linwood Chiles
Curtis Thorne
James Roane  stayed 

In February 1993, James Roane, Cory Johnson, and Richard Tipton were convicted in the Eastern District of Virginia for an array of criminal activity, including several capital murders, arising out of drug trafficking operations in and near Richmond. Each received at least one death sentence for his crimes, plus various terms of imprisonment. Tipton, Roane, and Cory Johnson were principal "partners" in a substantial drug-trafficking conspiracy that lasted from 1989 through July of 1992. The conspiracy's operations began in Trenton, New Jersey where Johnson and Tipton, both from New York City, became members. In August of 1990, the conspiracy expanded its operations to Richmond, Virginia where Roane joined the conspiracy in November of 1991. The Trenton-based operation came to an end on June 4, 1991 when police confiscated a large quantity of crack cocaine and firearms. In late 1991, the conspiracy's operations were expanded from the Central Gardens area of Richmond to a second area in Richmond called Newtowne. During the period of the conspiracy's operation, its "partners", including appellants, obtained wholesale quantities of powdered cocaine from suppliers in New York City, converted it by "cooking" [it] into crack cocaine, then packaged it, divided it among themselves, and distributed it through a network of 30-40 street level dealers, "workers." Typically, the appellants and their other partners in the conspiracy's operations took two-thirds of the proceeds realized from street-level sales of their product. Over a short span of time in early 1992, Tipton, Cory. Johnson, and Roane were variously implicated in the murders of ten persons within the Richmond area all in relation to their drug-trafficking operation and either because their victims were suspected of treachery or other misfeance, or because they were competitors in the drug trade, or because they had personally offended one of the "partners." On January 4, 1992, Tipton and Roane drove Douglas Talley, an underling in disfavor for mishandling a drug transaction, to the south side of Richmond. Once there, (Roane grabbed Talley from the rear while Tipton stabbed him repeatedly. The attack lasted three to five minutes and involved the infliction of eighty-four stab wounds to Talley's head, neck, and upper body that killed him. On the evening of January 13, 1992, Tipton and Roane went to the apartment of Douglas Moody, a suspected rival in their drug-trafficking area, where Tipton shot Moody twice in the back. After Moody fled by jumping through a window, both Tipton and Roane pursued. Roane, armed with a military-style knife retrieved from an apartment where the knife was kept for co-conspirator Curtis Thorne, caught up with Moody in the front yard of the apartment where he stabbed him eighteen times, killing him. On the night of January 14, 1992, Roane, Cory Johnson, and a third person retrieved a bag of guns that they had left at an apartment earlier that day. Roane then located Peyton Johnson, another rival drug dealer, at a tavern. Shortly after Roane left the tavern, Cory Johnson entered with another person and fatally shot Peyton Johnson with a semi-automatic weapon. On January 29, 1992, Roane pulled his car around the corner of an alley, got out of the vehicle, approached Louis Johnson, whom Johnson thought had threatened him while acting as bodyguard for a rival dealer, and shot him. Cory Johnson and co-conspirator Lance Thomas then got out of Roane's car and began firing at Louis Johnson. As Louis Johnson lay on the ground, either Cory Johnson or Thomas shot him twice at close range. Louis Johnson died from some or all of these gunshot wounds. On the evening of February 1, 1992, Cory Johnson and Lance Thomas were told that Roane had gone to the apartment of Torrick Brown, with whom Roane had been having trouble. Johnson and Thomas armed themselves with semi-automatic weapons and went to the apartment where they joined Roane outside. The three then knocked on Brown's door and asked his half-sister, Martha McCoy, if Brown was there. She summoned Brown to the door and Cory Johnson, Roane, and Thomas opened fire with semi-automatic weapons, killing Brown and critically wounding McCoy. In late January, 1992, after being threatened by Cory Johnson for not paying for a supply of crack cocaine, Dorothy Armstrong went to live with her brother, Bobby Long. On February 1, Cory Johnson learned from Jerry Gaiters the location of Long's house. Thereafter, Tipton and an unidentified "young fellow" picked up Gaiters and Cory Johnson who were then driven by Tipton to a house where the group obtained a bag of guns. After dropping off the unidentified third party, the group proceeded to Long's house. Upon arriving at Long's house, Cory Johnson and Gaiters got out of the car and approached the house. While Tipton waited in the car, Cory Johnson and Gaiters went to the front door. When Long opened the door, Cory Johnson opened fire, killing both Dorothy Armstrong and Anthony Carter, Bobby Long fled out the front door, but was fatally shot by Cory Johnson in the front yard. In early February 1992, Cory Johnson began to suspect that Linwood Chiles was cooperating with the police. On February 19, 1992, Johnson borrowed Valerie Butler's automobile and arranged to meet with Chiles. That night, Chiles, Curtis Thorne, and sisters Priscilla and Gwen Greene met Cory Johnson and drove off together in Chiles's station wagon. Chiles parked the car in an alley, and Tipton soon drove in behind it in another car, got out, and came up alongside the station wagon. With Tipton standing by, Cory Johnson told Chiles to place his head on the steering wheel and then shot Chiles twice at close range. Additional shots were fired, killing Thorne and critically wounding both of the Greene sisters. The autopsy report indicated that Thorne had been hit by bullets fired from two different directions. Tipton was charged with capital murder for eight of these killings, Talley, Moody, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, and Chiles. Cory Johnson, with seven, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton. Roane, with three, Moody, Louis Johnson and Peyton Johnson. The jury convicted Tipton of six of the eight capital murders with which he was charged under, Talley, Armstrong, Long, Carter, Chiles, and Thorne. One of the other two charges was dismissed, Louis Johnson and the other resulted in acquittal of Moody. Tipton was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute , engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, eight counts of committing acts of violence, the eight killings, in the aid of racketeering activity, two counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking crime, and two counts of possessing cocaine base with intent to distribute. The jury convicted Cory Johnson of all seven of the capital murders with which he was charged under, Louis Johnson, Long, Carter, Armstrong, Thorne, Chiles, and Peyton Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, eleven counts of committing acts of violence including the seven killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity , five counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or drug-trafficking offense, and two counts of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute The jury convicted Roane of all three of the capital murders with which he was charged under Moody, Peyton Johnson, and Louis Johnson. He was also convicted of conspiracy to possess cocaine base with the intent to distribute, engaging in a CCE, five counts of committing acts of violence including the three killings charged under in aid of racketeering activity, four counts of using a firearm in relation to a crime of violence or a drug-trafficking offense and one count of possession of cocaine base with the intent to distribute. Following a penalty hearing on the capital murder counts, the jury recommended that Cory Johnson be sentenced to death on all of the seven murders of which he had been convicted; that Tipton be sentenced to death for three of the six murders of which he was convicted Talley, Chiles, and Thorne and that Roane be sentenced to death for one of the three of which he was convicted. Moody. The district court sentenced Johnson, Tipton, and Roane to death in accordance with the jury's recommendations, and imposed various sentences of imprisonment upon each of the appellants for several non-capital counts on which they were convicted and for those capital murder counts on which Tipton and Roane had been convicted but were not given death sentences.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 12, 2006   North Carolina Minh Rogers
Linda Rogers, 16
Jerry Conner stayed 

Jerry Conner was sentenced to die for the murder and rape of Minh Rogers and her 16-year-old daughter, Linda, in 1990. Conner told police that he committed rape, but the lawyers said he is borderline mentally retarded and is unreliable. The rape conviction was used during Conner's 1995 trial to help justify the death sentence. Conner's shoeprint was found in the girl's blood and Conner's confession to police was consistent with crime scene details.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 16, 2006   Texas Jennifer Ertman, 14
Elizabeth Pena, 16

Patricia Lourdes Lopez
Derrick O'Brien stayed 

Jennifer Ertman and Elizabeth Pena were 14 and 16 years old, respectively. They were friends who attended the same high school in Houston, Texas, Waltrip High School. On June 24, 1993, the girls spent the day together and then died together. They were last seen by friends about 11:15 at night, when they left a friend's apartment to head home, to beat summer curfew at 11:30. They knew they would be late if they took the normal path home, down W. 34th Street to T.C. Jester, both busy streets. They also knew they would have to pass a sexually-oriented business on that route and so decided to take a well-known shortcut down a railroad track and through a city park to Elizabeth's neighborhood. The next morning, the girls parents began to frantically look for them, paging them on their pagers, calling their friends to see if they knew where they were, to no avail. The families filed missing persons reports with the Houston Police Department and continued to look for the girls on their own. The Ertmans and Penas gathered friends and neighbors to help them pass out a huge stack of fliers with the girls' pictures all over the Houston area, even giving them to newspaper vendors on the roadside. Four days after the girls disappeared, a person identifying himself as 'Gonzalez' called the Crimestoppers Tips number. He told the call taker that the missing girls' bodies could be found near T.C. Jester Park at White Oak bayou. The police were sent to the scene and searched the park without finding anything. The police helicopter was flying over the park and this apparently prompted Mr. 'Gonzalez' to make a 911 call, directing the search to move to the other side of the bayou. When the police followed this suggestion, they found the badly decaying bodies of Jenny and Elizabeth. Jennifer Ertman's dad, Randy Ertman, was about to give an interview regarding the missing girls to a local television reporter when the call came over a cameraman's police scanner that two bodies had been found. Randy commandeered the news van and went to the scene that was now bustling with police activity. Randy Ertman appeared on the local news that evening, screaming at the police officers who were struggling to hold him back, "Does she have blond hair? Does she have blond hair?!!?" Fortunately, they did manage to keep Randy from entering the woods and seeing his daughter's brutalized body and that of her friend Elizabeth. The bodies were very badly decomposed, even for four days in Houston's brutal summer heat and humidity, particularly in the head, neck and genital areas. The medical examiner later testified that this is how she could be sure as to the horrible brutality of the rapes, beatings and murders. The break in solving the case came from, of course, the 911 call. It was traced to the home of the brother of one of the men later sentenced to death for these murders. When the police questioned 'Gonzalez', he said that he had made the original call at his 16 year-old wife's urging. She felt sorry for the families and wanted them to be able to put their daughters' bodies to rest. 'Gonzalez' said that his brother was one of the six people involved in killing the girls, and gave police the names of all but one, the new recruit, whom he did not know. His knowledge of the crimes came from the killers themselves, most of whom came to his home after the murders, bragging and swapping the jewelry they had stolen from the girls. While Jenny and Elizabeth were living the last few hours of their lives, Peter Cantu, Efrain Perez, Derrick Sean O'Brien, Joe Medellin and Joe's 14 year old brother were initiating a new member, Raul Villareal, into their gang, known as the Black and Whites. Raul was an acquaintance of Efrain and was not known to the other gang members. They had spent the evening drinking beer and then "jumping in" Raul. This means that the new member was required to fight every member of the gang until he passed out and then he would be accepted as a member. Testimony showed that Raul lasted through three of the members before briefly losing consciousness.  The gang continued drinking and 'shooting the breeze' for some time and then decided to leave. Two brothers who had been with them but testified that they were not in the gang left first and passed Jenny and Elizabeth, who were unknowingly walking towards their deaths. When Peter Cantu saw Jenny and Elizabeth, he thought it was a man and a woman and told the other gang members that he wanted to jump him and beat him up. He was frustrated that he had been the one who was unable to fight Raul. The gang members ran and grabbed Elizabeth and pulled her down the incline, off of the tracks. Testimony showed that Jenny had gotten free and could have run away but returned to Elizabeth when she cried out for Jenny to help her. For the next hour or so, these beautiful, innocent young girls were subjected to the most brutal gang rapes that most of the investigating officers had ever encountered. The confessions of the gang members that were used at trial indicated that there was never less than 2 men on each of the girls at any one time and that the girls were repeatedly raped orally, anally and vaginally for the entire hour. One of the gang members later said during the brag session that by the time he got to one of the girls, "she was loose and sloppy." One of the boys boasted of having 'virgin blood' on him. The 14-year-old juvenile later testified that he had gone back and forth between his brother and Peter Cantu since they were the only ones there that he really knew and kept urging them to leave. He said he was told repeatedly by Peter Cantu to "get some". He raped Jennifer and was later sentenced to 40 years for aggravated sexual assault, which was the maximum sentence for a juvenile. When the rapes finally ended, the horror was not over. The gang members took Jenny and Elizabeth from the clearing into a wooded area, leaving the juvenile behind, saying he was "too little to watch". Jenny was strangled with the belt of Sean O'Brien, with two murderers pulling, one on each side, until the belt broke. Part of the belt was left at the murder scene, the rest was found in O'Brien's home. After the belt broke, the killers used her own shoelaces to finish their job. Medellin later complained that "the bitch wouldn't die" and that it would have been "easier with a gun". Elizabeth was also strangled with her shoelaces, after crying and begging the gang members not to kill them; bargaining, offering to give them her phone number so they could get together again. The medical examiner testified that Elizabeth's two front teeth were knocked out of her brutalized mouth before she died and that two of Jennifer's ribs were broken after she had died. Testimony showed that the girls' bodies were kicked and their necks were stomped on after the strangulations in order to "make sure that they were really dead." The juvenile, Venancio Medellin, pled guilty to his charge and his sentence was reviewed when he turned 18, at which time he was sent to serve the remainder of the sentence in prison. The five killers were tried for capital murder in Harris County, Texas, convicted and sentenced to death. See US 5th Circuit Court summary of this case. Six months before Jenny and Elizabeth were murdered, three of their killers murdered another young woman, Patricia Lourdes Lopez. Patricia, a 27-year-old mother of two young children, had run out of gas and was stranded on the side of the freeway on her way home from a football game. She walked to a nearby convenience store, and called someone to come and help her. As she was leaving, she was stopped by Joe Medellin, Peter Cantu and Sean O'Brien, who asked her to buy them some beer since they were underage. They said they would buy her some gas and get her on the road again if she did. She bought the beer and went with the group, unwittingly heading to her death. Instead of taking her back to her truck, the trio took her to a back parking lot in Melrose Park in Houston, where they took turns raping and sexually assaulting her before stabbing her to death. A drunken O'Brien had told Patricia that if she did not cause him to have an erection through oral sex, he would kill her. Her body, nude from the waist down, was found by police on January 4, 1993 with her blood-soaked clothing strewn about her. The medical examiner stated that Patricia was probably on her knees in front of her murderer when she was stabbed, based on the angle of the wounds. She had been stabbed and slashed in the abdomen, throat and back and strangled. This murder was unsolved until after O'Brien was arrested for the murder of Jennifer Ertman and Elizabeth Pena. Joe Cantu, brother of ringleader Peter Cantu, whose call to police had led to the arrests in the Ertman/Pena murders, had again contacted authorities and told them that he recalled O'Brien bragging about another murder that occurred before the girls were killed. Houston police researched older cases and found a possible match with the unsolved murder of Patricia Lourdes Lopez.  When they tested evidence, O'Brien's fingerprints were matched to some found on a beer can under Patricia's body at the murder scene. When confronted with the evidence, O'Brien admitted his involvement in Patricia's murder. A belt of the same type that was used to kill Jennifer Ertman was found underneath Patricia's neck. Medellin's DNA matched semen samples taken from Patricia's body. Her family was present at his trial for the June murders. "I think they should file some more charges," Cathy Lopez, Patricia Lopez's mother-in-law, said. "I think whatever they did, no matter how much there is, they should stand trial for every single thing." Patricia's estranged husband suffered through a long period of being considered a suspect in his wife's murder. UPDATE: The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals issued a stay 27 hours before Sean O'Brien's scheduled execution in order to consider his appeal regarding the constitutionality of lethal injection. Two days later, the same court reversed itself and lifted the stay, however the death warrant had expired and the process of setting a new execution date will begin again. 

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 17, 2006   Texas Kaylene Harris, 13  Tommy Sells stayed 

May 17 has been set as the execution date for Tommy Lynn Sells for the 1999 rape and murder of 13-year-old Kaylene Harris, of Del Rio. Sells was a serial killer who has confessed to more than a dozen murders and is suspected in many more in various parts of the US. Sells was an unemployed drifter who worked odd jobs as a barber, mechanic, laborer and carnival roustabout. Kaylene was murdered on New Year's Eve in 1999. Sells admitted to murdering the girl after he broke into her family's mobile home in Del Rio. He also cut the throat of an eleven-year-old girl who was spending the night with Kaylene, but that child survived. Krystal Surles managed to walk a long distance to a neighbor's house to get help. She later identified Sells as the attacker.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 17, 2006   Texas Betsy Nutt, 41
Cody Nutt, 15
Jermaine Herron executed 

A Refugio District Judge set execution dates for Derrick Frazier and Jermaine Herron. The men shot 41-year-old Betsy Nutt and her 15-year-old son Cody Nutt at their ranch in Refugio County in 1997. Both victims were shot in the head several times. On June 26, 1997, Jerry Nutt had found his wife Betsy and son Cody. They had been killed in the family's mobile home at the Dos Amigos Ranch in Refugio, Texas. A pickup truck had been stolen, and a neighboring residence had been burglarized and set on fire. The pickup truck was found outside a Victoria apartment complex later that day, and Derrick Frazier was arrested there and brought in for questioning. An arrest warrant was issued for another suspect in the case, Jermaine Herron, and Herron turned himself in a few days later. Jerry Nutt testified that he had found his wife and son dead. Members of the family whose house was burglarized and burned testified that Frazier and Herron had paid a visit to their ranch the day before the murders, on the pretense of looking for work. Herron knew the family because his father had once worked for them, and he introduced Frazier as his cousin Kenny. An 18-year-old female testified that she and her boyfriend had driven the men to the Dos Amigos Ranch that day, and that her boyfriend had driven them there the following day when the burglary and the murders had taken place. The men had spent the morning at the mobile home, gathering up items they planned to steal, including guns and jewelry. They planned to kill the family, but got tired of waiting and walked the quarter mile to the Nutt home. The men told Betsy they were stranded and asked for drinks. Betsy offered to give the men a ride into Refugio. She left Cody in the house and went to the pickup truck with Frazier and Herron. As she started the truck, Herron said he needed to go to the bathroom, and returned to the house. Shortly thereafter, he enticed Betsy to return to the house, saying she had a phone call. Frazier made a videotaped confession where he admitted to killing Betsy Nutt using a 9 mm pistol they had stolen from the other house. Then Herron shot Cody with the same weapon. Victoria Texas police spotted the Nutt's green Ford pickup truck later that night at an apartment complex and arrested Frazier. Both men had execution dates set at the same hearing. After their execution dates were set, Jerry Nutt, the husband and father of the victims, said, "This is one of the happiest days of my life in the past 81/2 years. Only two days are going to be better and you know which two days those are going to be," Nutt said. Nutt says he will travel to Huntsville to witness the executions. "Well the first three years after it happened, until I met my wife...I was going downhill. I'm not going to kid you. I didn't do anything," he said. Nutt remarried five years ago. The couple said said Betsy and Cody are still a big part of their lives. Jerry Nutt said, "We still have a shrine for Betsy and Cody up in the house. I told her, 'You can take that down; we're starting a new life.' She said, 'Cody and Betsy made you who you are...so they are always going to be part of our lives'. Jane Nutt said, "Betsy and I have actually become quite good friends. When Jerry does something that is frustrating, I talk to Betsy's picture...I say, 'okay Betsy you should've straightened him out on this...'," Jane said.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 17, 2006   Tennessee Suzanne Marie Collins, 19 Sedley Alley stayed 

Sedley Alley, a civilian married to a military person, abducted nineteen-year old Lance Corporal Suzanne Marie Collins while she was jogging near Millington Naval Base in Millington, Tennessee late in the evening of July 11, 1985. He attacked and murdered her and left her body in a field. Two marines jogging near where Collins was abducted heard Collins scream and ran toward the sound. However, before they reached the scene, they saw Alley's car drive off. They reported to base security and accompanied officers on a tour of the base, looking for the car they had seen. Unsuccessful, they returned to their barracks. Soon after returning to their quarters, however, the marines were called back to the security office, where they identified Alley's car, which had been stopped by officers. Alley and his wife gave statements to the base security personnel accounting for their whereabouts. The security personnel were satisfied with Alley's story, and Alley and his wife returned to their on-base housing. Collins's body was found a few hours later, and Alley was immediately arrested by military police. He voluntarily gave a statement to the police, admitting to having killed Collins but giving a substantially false - and considerably more humane - account of the circumstances of the killing. Sedley Alley's story was that his wife left him after getting in a fight. He drank two six-packs of beer and a bottle of wine. He told authorities that he had gone out for more liquor when his car accidentally hit 19-year-old Suzanne Collins as she jogged near the Millington Naval Base. Alley said that he accidentally killed the young woman -- who was due to graduate from aviation school the next day. However, an autopsy revealed that her skull had been fractured with a screwdriver. After she died, a tree limb was rammed into her vagina so hard that it entered her abdomen and lacerated one of her lungs. Alley tried to convince a jury that he had multiple personality disorder. Alley was convicted on March 18, 1987 of murder in the first degree and was sentenced to death. He was also convicted of aggravated kidnapping and aggravated rape, for which he received consecutive forty-year sentences. He was scheduled to die by electrocution May 2, 1990, but was reprieved indefinitely by the state Court of Criminal Appeals. Judge Penny White made that decision, and she paid for it with her career. She was ousted from the bench during a fierce political campaign that portrayed her as soft on crime. Alley again had an execution date set for June 2004, but received another stay.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 19, 2006   Delaware Elizabeth Girardi, 47 Robert Jackson, III stayed

Robert W. Jackson, III, 32, was sentenced to death for the 1992 slaying of Elizabeth Girardi, 47, who was found dead outside of her Hockessin home. On April 3, 1992, Jackson and his friend Anthony Lachette broke into the home of Elizabeth Girardi with the intent of stealing items that could be pawned for money to buy marijuana. Elizabeth encountered the men in her driveway as they were leaving. According to court records, Lachette dropped the stolen items and fled. Jackson struck Girardi with a 4.7-pound splitting ax he took from a nearby woodshed. When Jackson heard his victim moan, he struck her three more times. Lachette pled guilty in 1993 to reduced charges of second-degree burglary and conspiracy and was sentenced to five years in prison and testified against Jackson. Lachette testified that Jackson told friends, "I think there's something wrong with me -- I don't feel any remorse." "He was real excited," Lachette told jurors. "It was like he got off on it." Lachette was released from prison in 1996, authorities said. After Jackson's conviction, Delaware's high court found that the sentencing phase of his trial was flawed and ordered a new one. His conviction was upheld. In September 1995, a second jury recommended 11-1 to execute Jackson.After Jackson's execution was stayed by federal district court judge Sue L. Robinson, Girardi's son, Christopher, 34, said he was disappointed. "What is taking place is really a disgrace," he said, and the idea that lethal injection is cruel and unusual is "ludicrous." Girardi said the system allows criminals too much time for appeals. "When do we take into consideration the victim's rights? He took my mother's life in an extremely brutal fashion. The problem with the system is I don't believe the punishment fits the crime. I lost my mother, and she will never know her grandchildren," he said.

 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
May 24, 2006   Texas Leonardo Chavez
Annette Chavez
Jesus Aguilar executed

Leonardo Chavez and his wife, Annette, were shot to death on June 10, 1995, while staying in a Harlingen trailer home belonging to Annette’s brother. The murder weapon was a .22 caliber pistol. The couple’s 9-year-old son, who witnessed the shooting, said he was awakened by a scuffle around 5:30 a.m. He said he watched from the kitchen as Quiroz shot his beaten father in the living room, then handed the gun to Ledesma, who shot his mother. Dressed for bed, both were shot in the back of the neck and died on the living room carpet near a large television and ceramic geese. Jesus Ledesma Aguilar sold a .22 revolver after the killings, and police recovered the weapon from a member of the buyer’s family. A police lab concluded that the bullets recovered from the victims’ bodies could have been fired from the gun. About two weeks after the killings, the couple's orphaned son saw a picture in the newspaper and told his grandmother that two of the men in the picture were the ones that hurt his parents. His grandfather took Leo Jr. to the police station where the youth identified Jesus Aguilar and Chris Quiroz as the men who shot his parents. Testimony at the trial indicted that the owner of the trailer had been involved in illicit drug sales with Jesus Aguilar. During the trial, the prosecution presented evidence that revealed Aguilar’s violent history. A Lubbock County police officer testified that he arrested Aguilar on August 14, 1983, for burglary of a building at a used car lot which had been broken into and ransacked. The officer arrested Aguilar in an adjacent field, where Aguilar had some tools taken from the building and nineteen car keys. Another Lubbock County peace officer testified that, on September 3, 1983, he attempted to apprehend Aguilar on a burglary warrant, and that Aguilar shot the officer in the leg and chest. The officer survived. Several prison guards testified about Aguilar’s violent assaults on guards and inmates in a Texas state prison. The prosecution introduced a judgment of conviction and eight-year sentence Aguilar received on January 23, 1984, for aggravated assault on a correctional officer. Several individuals testified about Aguilar’s violent assaults against guards and prisoners while in the Lubbock County Jail. The State’s evidence also revealed assaults Aguilar committed outside jail. In addition, the prosecution produced evidence that Aguilar is a confirmed member of a prison gang whose primary goal is to control all narcotics trafficking in the South and Southwest. A Houston police narcotics officer described the gang as “the most feared, fiercest, and deadliest of all the gangs.” Leonardo Chavez III is now a young man of 20 and plans to witness the execution of the man who killed his parents before his eyes.  "I want to see him die. They had no reason to do that to my parents," said Chavez. "My parents were on their knees, and I just saw them get blown away."

 

Page visited   Hit Counter times since 2/20/06

Page last updated 10/05/08


Copyright 2015  
Site created and maintained by Charlene Hall - info@prodeathpenalty.com