November 2009 Executions
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Four killers were executed in November 2009. They had murdered at least 7 people.
Six killers were given a stay in November 2009. They have murdered at least 22 people.
Two killers died while awaiting execution in November 2009. They had murdered at least 8 people.

Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 4, 2009 Florida William Evans
Darrell Beasley
Theron Burnham  
Paul Johnson stayed 
Paul Johnson and his wife visited their friends, Shayne and Ricky Carter, on the evening of January 8, 1981. While at their friends house, they all smoked marijuana and took injections of crystal methedrine. At trial, Ricky stated that he heard Johnson say he was going to obtain more drugs and that he would possibly steal something or rob someone.  Shayne also testified that Johnson stated he was going to obtain more drug money and that “if he had to shoot someone, he would have to shoot someone.” Taxicab driver William Evans picked up a fare in Polk County on the night of January 8, 1981. The cab dispatcher heard a stranger’s voice over the cab’s radio several times after midnight stating that Evans had been knocked out. That was the last communication that the dispatcher had with the cab, which was found five days later in a citrus grove located about a mile from where Evans’ body was found. Evans had been shot twice in the head and both his fare money and wallet were missing. The cab had been set on fire. At approximately 3:00 a.m. on January 9, 1981, Amy Reid and Darrell Beasley left a restaurant in Lakeland. A man who said that his car would not start approached them in the parking lot. The man also requested a ride to a friend’s house. Reid and Beasley complied and drove off with the stranger. The stranger asked Beasley to stop the car in a remote area so he could relieve himself. When the stranger returned to the car, he asked Beasley to walk to the back of the car with him. When Reid looked through the rear-view window, she saw the stranger pointing a gun at Beasley. Reid locked the doors in the car and drove to a convenience store several miles away where she called the Polk County Sheriff’s Office. Deputy Allison and Deputy Darrington were the officers who answered Reid’s call. After the deputies picked Reid up, she directed them to the location where she left Beasley and the stranger. Concurrently, another deputy, Theron Burnham, reported to dispatch that he had spotted a suspect on the road that Reid last saw Beasley. When Deputies Allison and Darrington arrived at Burnham’s location, they parked their car so that it faced Burnham’s patrol car. Burnham’s car had been left running with the lights on, but they did not see Burnham. A white male came out from a drainage ditch on one side of the road and quickly passed in between the patrol cars. He fired two shots at Deputies Allison and Darrington and fled across an open field. The deputies discovered Burnham’s body, which had been shot three times, in the drainage ditch and his service revolver was missing. Beasley’s body was found later that day with one gunshot wound to the head. His wallet was missing. On the following afternoon, Johnson’s wife and the Carters saw a police sketch of the suspect in the newspaper and talked about whether it resembled Johnson. Johnson later telephoned his wife at the Carters’ home, and she was visibly upset when she hung up the phone. Ricky spoke to Johnson and asked him if he was responsible for the killing that the newspaper talked about and Johnson replied, “if that’s what it says.” Ricky and Johnson’s wife went to get Johnson. Johnson changed into a new shirt before throwing his old shirt, which had been described in the newspaper, out the window. Upon returning to the Carter residence, Johnson relayed that he struck the officer with his gun when the officer told him to put his hands on the patrol car. A struggle ensued and Johnson shot the deputy three times. Paul Johnson was arrested for the murders of Beasley and Burnham on January 10, 1981. Johnson was charged the following week with taxi cab driver Evans’ murder. Reid, Allison, and Darrington identified Johnson. Additionally, Johnson’s fingerprints were discovered in the taxicab.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 5, 2009 Texas Joe Collins, 64 Khristian Oliver executed 
On April 20, 1999, a Nacogdoches County, Texas jury convicted Khristian Oliver of capital murder based on his killing of Joe Collins during the commission of a burglary. It was alleged at trial that on March 17, 1998, Oliver, his then-girlfriend Sonya Reed, and cohorts Bennie and Lonny Rubalcaba, were driving around Nacogdoches County, Texas, when they stopped at the empty home of Mr. Joe Collins to burglarize his house. Oliver and Lonny Rubalcaba broke into the house using bolt cutters, while Reed and Bennie Rubalcaba remained in their vehicle. Joe Collins came home during the break-in. Oliver and Rubalcaba tried to escape out a back door, but the door was bolted from the outside and the windows were barred. Joe then fired a shot from his gun, hitting Rubalcaba in the leg. Oliver and Rubalcaba were also armed with a pistol, and with a rifle they had found in Joe’s home. After Joe shot Rubalcaba, Khristian Oliver shot back. Oliver fired some shots inside the house and some outside in the front yard, where Joe ended up on his back. According to the trial testimony of Bennie Rubalcaba, Oliver then struck Joe several times in the head with the butt of the rifle. A forensic expert at trial testified that the gunshots probably were fatal, but that the blows from the rifle could have been fatal on their own. The group departed the scene, bringing the wounded Lonny Rubalcaba to a hospital, where they reported he had been the victim of a drive-by shooting. The next day, however, police officers interrogated the Rubalcabas, who provided information – and later testimony – that led to Khristian Oliver’s arrest and subsequent conviction.  
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 10, 2009 Ohio Angel Vincent, 16  Darryl Durr stayed 
On January 31, 1988, at approximately 10:50 p.m., Norma Jean O’Nan and her husband returned to their home in Elyria and discovered the front door unlocked, the lights and television on, and their sixteen-year-old daughter, Angel Vincent, missing. Only twenty minutes earlier, Mrs. O’Nan had spoken with her daughter by telephone to learn that Angel’s friend, Deborah Mullins, was at her home and that Deborah’s boyfriend, Darryl M. Durr, was expected to arrive later in the evening. That was the last chance Mrs. O’Nan would have to speak to her daughter alive. Mrs. O’Nan testified that Angel was wearing a hot pink sweater, a light pink and white checkered blouse, hot pink pants, and white tennis shoes when she and her husband left Angel home alone on the evening of January 31, 1988. After notifying the Elyria Police of Angel’s disappearance, Mrs. O’Nan searched her home to determine if any of Angel’s belongings were missing. Although Angel’s pink pants were found, Mrs. O’Nan’s search revealed the following items missing: an old lavender blanket with a hole in the center, a pair of black acid-washed denim jeans, Angel’s pink and white checkered blouse, light blue eyeglasses that Angel wore only in her home, a jean jacket that Angel had borrowed from a friend, an Avon necklace with an “A” charm attached, a small chain bracelet, an Avon slip-on bracelet, an inexpensive rhinestone ring and a dog chain that hung from her mirror. Mrs. O’Nan also discovered Angel’s handbag stuffed under her bed. Three or four days later, Mrs. O’Nan confronted Deborah Mullins and Durr regarding the disappearance of her daughter, and was told by Durr that “you know how kids are, she probably ran away.” On April 30, 1988, three boys noticed a foul odor coming from two orange traffic barrels while playing in Brookside Park. The barrels and been placed open end to open end, and were underneath a railroad tie. Upon separating the barrels, the boys discovered a severely decomposed female body that had been wrapped in a dirty old blanket. A portion of a leg was visible through a large hole in the blanket. A deputy coroner testified that the only clothing found on the victim was a pink sweater and a pair of white tennis shoes. The pink sweater had been pushed up well above the victim’s breast area. An initial external examination determined the body to be that of a young white female, who was in an advanced state of decomposition. The body was heavily infested with maggots and the body’s eyes and ears had been lost. There was also prominent evidence of animal activity about the inguinal and vulval regions of the body, and in and about the thighs. According to the deputy coroner, the decomposition was consistent with three months exposure. After examining the body, the deputy coroner concluded that the cause of death was homicidal violence. Since the body was so badly decomposed, the deputy coroner could not determine whether ligature marks, scrapes or tears indicating strangulation were present. There was no damage noted to the internal cartilaginous structures of the neck. The deputy coroner declined, however, to rule out strangulation as a cause of death since damage to these structures is not always present in young strangulation victims due to the flexibility of these structures. Because the body was so severely infested with bacteria, testing for the presence of acid phosphates and spermatozoa was inconclusive. In September, 1988, after Durr was arrested for two unrelated rapes, Deborah Mullins revealed her knowledge of Angel’s disappearance to the Cleveland Police Department. As the result of her information, an ankle X-ray obtained from Elyria Memorial Hospital, and dental records, the body discovered in Brookside Park was determined to be that of Angel Vincent. At trial, Deborah Mullins testified that on the evening Angel disappeared Deborah had asked Durr to drive to the house of one of Angel’s friends to retrieve a package of cigarettes for Angel. Durr agreed and left. Shortly thereafter, Durr returned to Deborah’s house and, instead of entering through the front door, began throwing stones at her upstairs bedroom window and blew his car horn for her to come out. Deborah and her baby, who had been fathered by Durr, left the house and entered Durr’s car where Durr brandished a knife toward both of them. As Durr was driving, Deborah heard noises from the back seat and after turning around discovered Angel bound on the rear floorboard. According to Deborah’s testimony, Angel was wearing black acid-washed denim jeans, a jean jacket, and tennis shoes when she was last seen in the back of Durr’s car. When Deborah asked Durr why Angel was bound in his car, Durr responded that he intended to “waste” her because “she would tell.” He never revealed just what Angel was going to tell. After threatening the life of both Deborah and his baby, Durr let Deborah out of his car. He returned to her home three or four hours later. Upon returning, Durr told Deborah that he had “wasted” Angel and that she should pack her things because they were leaving. Durr drove Deborah and their baby to his wife Janice Durr’s Cleveland apartment. After dropping Deborah and the baby off, Durr left with a duffle bag containing two shovels. When Durr returned, he was wet and covered with snow. Upon entering the room, Durr placed a ring and bracelet that belonged to Angel on a coffee table. As he was falling asleep, Durr told Deborah that he had strangled Angel with a dog chain until she “pissed, pooped and shit and made a few gurgling sounds,” took her body to a park, wrapped it in a blanket, placed it between two construction cones, and left her by some railroad tracks. Later that day or the next day, Durr burned a bag of clothing in the basement of Janice Durr’s apartment building and asked Deborah to model the black acid-washed jeans that Angel had worn on the evening of her abduction. Durr then drove Deborah, Janice Durr and his children to the west side of Cleveland where he burned another bag of items, and while driving from Cleveland toward Elyria, Durr threw Angel’s jean jacket out the car window. After arriving at Deborah’s home in Elyria, Deborah’s mother informed her that Mrs. O’Nan had come over and inquired about Deborah’s knowledge of Angels’s disappearance. Deborah testified that Durr threatened her and their baby’s life and instructed her to tell Mrs. O’Nan that Angel had been talking about running away. Deborah also testified that Durr took her and their baby to Edgewater Park where Durr threw Angel’s glasses over a cliff into the lake. A month or so later, while driving past the Cleveland Zoo, Durr pointed to a location and said, “Over there.” When Deborah questioned his statement, Durr replied, “You know what I am talking about.” Following a jury trial, Durr was convicted of aggravated murder; kidnapping; aggravated robbery; and rape. The trial court followed the jury’s recommendation and sentenced Durr to death.  
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status

November 10, 2009
Virginia Keenya Cook, 21
Jerry Ray Taylor, 60
Million Woldemarian, 41
Billy Gene Dillon, 37
Claudine Parker, 52
Hong Im Ballenger
James Martin, 55
James L. "Sonny" Buchanan, 39
Premkumar A. Walekar, 54
Sarah Ramos, 34
Lori Lewis-Rivera, 25
Pascal Charlot, 72
Dean Harold Meyers, 53
Kenneth Bridges, 53
Linda Franklin, 47
Conrad Johnson, 35
John Muhammad executed 
Keenya Cook, 21
2/16/2002
Jerry Ray Taylor, 60
3/19/2002
Billy Gene Dillon, 37
5/27/2002
Claudine Parker
9/21/2002
Hong Im Ballenger
9/23/2002
James Martin, 55
10/2/2002
Sonny Buchanan, 39
10/3/2002
Premkumar A. Walekar, 54
10/3/2002
Sarah Ramos, 34
10/3/2002
Lori Ann Lewis-Rivera, 25
10/3/2002
Pascal Charlot, 72
10/3/2002
Dean Harold Meyers, 53
10/9/2002
Kenneth Bridges, 53
10/11/2002
Linda Franklin, 47
10/14/2002
Conrad Johnson, 35
10/22/2002
Lee Boyd Malvo committed his first killing at John Allen Muhammad's bidding just 10 weeks after he ran away from his mother. Malvo confessed to the Feb. 16, 2002, slaying of Keenya Cook in Tacoma, saying he walked up to her house and shot her in the face at point-blank range, while her baby slept nearby. The bullet hit just below Keenya's left eye and lodged at the base of her skull. A month later, the pair had moved to Tuscon Arizona. Jerry Ray Taylor, 60, a salesman for a frozen-foods distributor, was an avid golfer who so loved the game that he made his own clubs. At lunchtime on March 19, Taylor pulled his silver Nissan pickup into the parking lot of the Fred Enke Golf Course, a mile or so from Newell's house. About a half-hour later, while Taylor was chipping balls alone in a practice area, a gunshot sounded in the distance. The bullet hit Taylor in the back, killing him on the spot. Two golfers discovered the body that afternoon; it had been dragged a short distance and partially hidden in a tangle of scrub brush. Taylor's wallet was found nearby, cash and credit cards inside. The slug that tore through his heart -- almost certainly from a high-powered rifle, police said -- hasn't been recovered and most likely shattered into minuscule fragments. There were no witnesses. Paul J. LaRuffa was a restaurateur in Clinton, Maryland. At the end of the day on September 5, 2002, LaRuffa closed his restaurant and proceeded to take his laptop computer and $3500 in cash and credit receipts to his car. After he sat behind the steering wheel, he saw a figure to his left and a flash of light, then heard gunshots. LaRuffa was shot six times, but survived. An employee who left the restaurant with LaRuffa witnessed the shooting and called 911. He testified that he saw a "kid" run up to LaRuffa’s car, fire into it, and take the briefcase and laptop. The briefcase and empty deposit bags were found six weeks later in a wooded area approximately a mile from the shooting. The DNA from clothing found nearby was consistent with that of Lee Boyd Malvo. On September 15, 2002, there was a second shooting in Clinton, Maryland: Muhammad Rashid was locking the front door of the Three Roads Liquor Store from the outside when he heard gunshots behind him. A young man then rushed him and shot him in the stomach. Rashid testified that the young man was Malvo. Almost a week later, on September 21, 2002, Claudine Parker and Kellie Adams, 24, were shot after closing the Zelda Road ABC Liquor Store in Montgomery, Alabama. Claudine Parker, a Sunday school teacher and civil rights champion, died as a result of her gunshot wound through the back—the bullet transected her spinal cord and passed through her lung. Adams was shot through the neck, and the bullet exited through her chin, breaking her jaw in half, shattering her face and teeth, paralyzing her left vocal cord, and severing nerves in her left shoulder. Yet, she survived. Adams said she never lost consciousness after being shot and show a slender black man standing over her. Bullets recovered from the shooting were eventually identified as coming from a Bushmaster high-powered rifle. While the rifle was being fired, Malvo was seen approaching Parker and Adams. A police car passed by the scene immediately after the shooting, and the officers observed Malvo going through the women’s purses. The officers gave chase, but Malvo escaped. In the process, however, he dropped a gun catalog. Malvo’s fingerprints were found on the catalog, and a .22-caliber, stainless-steel revolver was found in the stairwell of an apartment building that Malvo traversed. The revolver was the same as the one used to shoot LaRuffa and Rashid. Two days later, on September 23, 2002, the manager of a Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Beauty Depot store, Hong Im Ballenger, was walking to her car after closing the store for the evening when she was shot once in the head. The bullet entered the back of her head and exited through her jawbone. She died as a result of the wound. The bullet was determined to have come from the Bushmaster rifle found on Muhammad MUHAMMAD v. KELLY 3 during his arrest. Witnesses saw Malvo flee from the scene with Ballenger’s purse. The sixth and seventh shootings occurred in Silver Spring, Maryland, on October 3, 2002. At approximately 8:15 a.m., Premkumar A. Walekar was shot while fueling his taxicab. The bullet went through his left arm and entered his chest, where it fatally damaged his heart. At approximately 8:30 a.m., Sarah Ramos was killed while sitting on a bench in front of the Crisp & Juicy Restaurant in the Leisure World Shopping Center. The bullet entered through the front of her head and exited through her spinal cord at the top of the neck. Both bullets were identified as having come from a Bushmaster rifle, and an eyewitness identified Muhammad’s Chevrolet Caprice at the scene of the second shooting. On October 3, 2002, at approximately 10:00 a.m., Lori Lewis-Rivera was shot in the back while vacuuming her car at a Shell gas station in Kensington, Maryland. The bullet was identified as coming from a Bushmaster rifle. An eyewitness said that he saw a Chevrolet Caprice in the area approximately twenty minutes before the shooting. At approximately 7:00 p.m., a police officer stopped Muhammad for running two stop signs. The officer gave Muhammad a verbal warning and released him. Later that night, at approximately 9:15 p.m., Pascal Charlot was shot in the chest as he crossed the intersection of Georgia Avenue and Kalmia Road in the District of Columbia. Charlot’s shooting happened about thirty blocks from where Muhammad was stopped. The bullet fragments from both the Lewis-Rivera and the Charlot shootings were identified as coming from a Bushmaster rifle. The next day, October 4, 2002, Caroline Seawell was putting bags in her minivan outside of a Michael’s craft store in Fredericksburg, Virginia, when she was shot once in the back. The bullet damaged her liver and exited through her right breast, but she survived the attack. An eyewitness testified to seeing a Caprice in the parking lot at the time of the shooting, and ballistics tests determined the bullet fragments came from a Bushmaster rifle. On October 6, 2002, Tanya Brown was taking Iran Brown to Tasker Middle School in Bowie, Maryland. As Iran was walking on the sidewalk to the school, he was shot once in the chest. Tanya drove Iran to a health care center where surgeons were able to save his life despite lung damage, a large hole in his diaphragm, damage to the left lobe of his liver, and lacerations to his stomach, pancreas, and spleen. Two eyewitnesses testified that they saw a Caprice in the vicinity of the school the day before and the morning of the shooting. One eyewitness positively identified both Muhammad and Malvo in the Caprice the morning of the shooting. The police searched the surrounding area and found a ballpoint pen and a shell casing in the woods near the school. The area had been pressed down like a blind used to conceal hunters. The tissue samples from the pen matched Muhammad’s DNA, and the shell casing and bullet fragments were determined to have come from a Bushmaster rifle. The Brown shooting was also the first time that police discovered communications from the shooters. The tarot card for death was found, and on it was written, "Call me God." On the back, someone had written, "For you, Mr. Police. Code: Call me God. Do not release to the Press." Three days later, on October 9, 2002, Dean Meyers was fueling his car at a Sunoco station in Manassas, Virginia, when he was shot in the head by a single bullet. The bullet was later determined to have come from a Bushmaster rifle. An eyewitness testified that she saw Muhammad and Malvo in the area approximately one hour prior. The police actually interviewed Muhammad in a parking lot across the street immediately after the shooting, and they later found a map with Muhammad’s fingerprints in the parking lot. On October 11, 2002, Kenneth Bridges was fired upon at an Exxon gas station in Massaponax, Virginia. He was shot once in the chest by a bullet identified as having come from the Bushmaster rifle. Two eyewitnesses testified that they saw a Caprice at or near the Exxon that morning. The fourteenth shooting occurred on October 14, 2002, in Falls Church, Virginia. Linda Franklin and her husband were loading their car outside of a Home Depot when she was shot in the head by a single bullet and killed. Ballistics experts determined that the bullet was from a Bushmaster rifle. The next day, October 15, a Rockville, Maryland, dispatcher received the following telephone call: "Don’t say anything, just listen, we’re the people who are causing the killings in your area. Look on the tarot card, it says, ‘call me God, do not release to press.’ We’ve called you three times before trying to set up negotiations. We’ve gotten no response. People have died." The caller hung up before the dispatcher could transfer the call to the Sniper Task Force. Three days later, on October 18, Officer Derek Baliles of the Montgomery County, Maryland, Police received a telephone call. The caller told Baliles to "shut up" and said that he knew who was doing the shootings, but wanted the police to verify some information before he said anything further. The caller asked questions about the Parker and Adams shootings in Alabama and hung up again. When the caller called again, Baliles verified the shootings. The caller stated that he needed to find more coins and a telephone without surveillance, then hung up. The same day, William Sullivan, a priest in Ashland, Virginia, received a telephone call from two people. The first male voice told him that someone else wanted to speak to him. The second male voice said that "the lady didn’t have to die," and "it was at the Home Depot." The caller then told him about the shooting in Alabama and said, "Mr. Policeman, I am God. Do not tell the press." The caller concluded by telling Sullivan to relay the information to the police. The next day, October 19, 2002, Jeffery Hopper and his wife were leaving a restaurant in Ashland, Virginia, when he was shot in the abdomen. Hopper survived, but his injuries required five surgeries to repair his pancreas, stomach, kidneys, liver, diaphragm, and intestines. In the woods near the crime scene, police discovered another blind similar to the one at the Brown shooting. They also found a shell casing, a candy wrapper, and a plastic sandwich bag that was attached with a thumbtack to a tree at eye level and was decorated with Halloween characters and self-adhesive stars. The shell casing and bullets were determined to have come from a Bushmaster rifle. The candy wrapper contained Muhammad’s and Malvo’s DNA. The sandwich bag contained a handwritten message: For you Mr. Police. "Call me God." Do not release to the Press. We have tried to contact you to start negotiation . . . These people took our call for a Hoax or Joke, so your failure to respond has cost you five lives. If stopping the killing is more important than catching us now, then you will accept our demand which are non-negotiable. (i) You will place ten million dollar in Bank of america account . . . We will have unlimited withdrawl at any atm worldwide. You will activate the bank account, credit card, and pin number. We will contact you at Ponderosa Buffet, Ashland, Virginia, tel. # . . . 6:00 am Sunday Morning. You have until 9:00 a.m. Monday morning to complete transaction. "Try to catch us withdrawing at least you will have less body bags." If trying to catch us now more important then prepare you body bags. If we give you our word that is what takes place. "Word is Bond." P.S. Your children are not safe anywhere at anytime. However, the note was not discovered until after the deadline had passed. Surveillance videotapes from that day identified Muhammad at a Big Lots store near the shooting. The day after Hopper was shot, the FBI Sniper Tip Line received a call from a male who stated, "Don’t talk. Just listen. Call me God. I left a message for you at the Ponderosa. I am trying to reach you at the Ponderosa. Be there to take a call in ten minutes." On October 21, 2002, the FBI negotiations team received a call that had been re-routed from the Ponderosa telephone number. A recorded voice said: Don’t say anything. Just listen. Dearest police, Call me God. Do not release to the press. Five red stars. You have our terms. They are non-negotiable. If you choose Option 1, you will hold a press conference stating to the media that you believe you have caught the sniper like a duck in a noose. Repeat every word exactly as you heard it. If you choose Option 2, be sure to remember we will not deviate. P.S. – Your children are not safe. The next day at around 6:00 a.m., Conrad Johnson, a bus driver for the Montgomery County Transit Authority, was shot in the chest as he was entering his bus in Aspen Hill, Maryland. Johnson was conscious when the rescue workers arrived, but died at the hospital. The bullet fragments were determined to have come from a Bushmaster rifle. At another blind discovered nearby, a black duffle bag and a brown left-handed glove were found. DNA from hair found in the duffle bag matched that of Muhammad. Another plastic bag that contained self-adhesive stars and a note was left behind. On October 24, 2002, the FBI captured Muhammad and Malvo at a rest area in Frederick County, Maryland. They were asleep in a Caprice, where police found a loaded .223- caliber Bushmaster rifle behind the rear seat. The DNA on the rifle matched that of both Muhammad and Malvo, although the only fingerprints found on the rifle were those of Malvo. The Caprice had been modified with heavy window tint, a hinged rear seat that provided easy access to the trunk from the passenger compartment, and a hole that had been cut into the trunk lid just above the license plate. Covering the hole was a right-handed brown glove that matched the left-handed glove found near the Johnson shooting, and a rubber seal crossed over the hole. Moreover, the trunk had been spray-painted blue. Police also found the following items in the Caprice: a global positioning system receiver; a magazine about rifles; an AT&T telephone charge card; ear plugs; maps; plastic sandwich bags; a rifle scope; .223-caliber ammunition; two-way radios; a digital voice recorder; a receipt from a Baton Rouge, Louisiana, grocery store, dated September 27, 2002; an electronic organizer; a plastic bag from Big Lots; a slip of paper containing the Sniper Task Force telephone number; and a list of schools in the Baltimore area. Moreover, police found LaRuffa’s laptop computer, onto which Muhammad had loaded "Microsoft Streets and Trips 2002" on September 2, 2002. In the software program, maps had been marked with icons, including some with a skull and crossbones. Icons indicated where Walekar, Lewis-Rivera, Seawell, Brown, Meyers, and Franklin had been shot. There was also a document entitled "Allah8.rtf" that contained portions of the text communicated to police in the extortion demands. In total, Muhammad was accused of shooting sixteen people and killing ten of them. Muhammad was convicted by a jury in the Circuit Court of Prince William County, Virginia, on November 17, 2003, for the 2002 capital murder of Dean Meyers as more than one murder in three years; for the capital murder of Meyers in the commission of an act of terrorism; for conspiracy to commit capital murder; and for the illegal use of a firearm during the commission of murder. On November 24, 2003, the jury sentenced Muhammad to death for the capital murder and to twenty-three years in prison for the other crimes.  
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 10, 2009 Texas Jose Martin Junco  Yosvanis Valle executed 
Houston Police Officer Ronald Plotner testified that, between approximately 11:00 p.m. and 12:00 a.m. on June 7, 1999, he was dispatched to a shooting at a house. When he arrived, Officer Plotner discovered the body of Jose Martin Junco, the victim, with multiple gunshot wounds to his head, back and arm. Jose Arenazas, Kenneth Estrada's friend, testified that he met Estrada in February or March of 1999 and "ran with" Estrada, Fernando Valdez, and Yosvanis Valle, who was considered the leader of the group. On June 7, 1999, a meeting took place at Valle's apartment between Valle, Valdez, Arenazas, a man named Flaco, and Estrada. Also present were Valle's girlfriend, Christina, and Estrada's girlfriend, Anna Sanchez. At the meeting, Arenazas had a .357 magnum revolver, Valle had a 9 millimeter pistol, and Estrada had a small chrome .22 caliber pistol. During the meeting, Valle announced that Estrada had shown some weakness, and Valle wanted to test Estrada to "see if he had any heart." Estrada proposed that the men rob Junco because Estrada knew Junco kept money and narcotics at his house. Valle told Estrada that Estrada must follow through with the plan or Arenazas would "take care of him." Arenazas took this to mean that he would have to shoot Estrada. Estrada told Valle that he was committed to going through with the robbery and he would kill Junco if Junco recognized Estrada. Arenazas further testified that he was assigned as the driver of the car for the robbery and he gave his .357 revolver to Estrada. Arenazas, Valdez, Flaco, Valle and Estrada drove to Junco's house and honked the car's horn. Junco came outside, and Estrada got out of the car, approached Junco, and asked him for an "eight-ball," or $100 worth of cocaine. When Valle got out of the car, Estrada pulled out his gun and pointed it at Junco. Valdez, Flaco, Valle and Estrada forced Junco back into the house. After about five minutes, Arenazas heard multiple gunshots and saw the men come running out of the house. On the drive back to Valle's apartment, Valle asked Estrada if he shot Junco. Estrada showed them a sock he had on his hand with a hole in it as proof he fired his gun. Valle boasted that he shot Junco ten times, but he was angry that they only had stolen $100 and a quarter ounce of cocaine. After the men returned to the apartment, Arenazas took back the .357 revolver and saw that only one shot had been fired by Estrada. Amy Lindgren testified that she and her one-year old daughter lived at Junco's house and were present at the time of the murder. Lindgren was on the couch in the living room, her daughter was sleeping in a playpen in the back bedroom, and Junco was in the bathroom when, at about 11:00 p.m., Lindgren heard a car honk its horn, which was usually a signal that someone wanted to buy cocaine. Junco went out the front door and came back with his hands up with a man following behind with a gun to Junco's back. Junco told Lindgren not to look at the men, but she looked at one, whom she later identified as Estrada. Estrada threatened Lindgren and pointed his gun at her. A pillow was placed over her head, she was moved to the floor, and a blanket was thrown on top of her. She then heard yelling, several gunshots, the men running out of the house, and a car driving away. Lindgren went to the bedroom, found her daughter unharmed, and saw Junco, still alive, kneeling by the bed with gunshot wounds to his back and neck. She then called 911. Estrada's girlfriend, Anna Sanchez, testified that she and Estrada were living with Valle at the time of the murder. During the January 7, 1999 meeting, she heard Estrada suggest robbing Junco. She had previously heard Valle tell Estrada that if he was going to stay in his house, he would have to rob people and do whatever Valle told him to do. Sanchez testified that Estrada told her that Valle had previously threatened to kill Estrada if he did not do what Valle wanted. After the shooting, Estrada told Sanchez he shot his gun at Junco but was not certain that the bullet had hit Junco. After Estrada was in jail, he asked Sanchez to lie about his activities on the night of the murder, make up an alibi that he was with another man, and state that she and Estrada were in a common law marriage. Although he asked her to refuse to testify, she testified voluntarily. Estrada did not testify.  
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 17, 2009 Texas Cynthia Bogany, 28
Chirissa Bogany, 9
Gerald Eldridge stayed 
In April 1994, Gerald Cornelius Eldridge was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for killing Cynthia Bogany and her nine-year-old daughter, Chirissa. Cynthia Bogany was Eldridge’s former girlfriend and the mother of his seven-year-old son, Terrell. On January 4, 1993, Eldridge went to Cynthia Bogany’s apartment and kicked in the door. Chirissa had been sleeping on the couch and Eldridge shot her between the eyes at point-blank range, killing her instantly. Eldridge then stood over his son Terrell and shot at his head at close range, but the boy testified that he turned his head and the bullet went in his shoulder. Eldridge shot Cynthia's boyfriend, Wayne Dotson, who also was wounded but survived. Cynthia fled the apartment but Eldridge chased and caught her when she tripped and fell on the stairs outside a neighbor’s apartment. Despite Cynthia’s pleas for her life, Eldridge shot her twice in the head, killing her instantly. Eldridge was twenty-eight years old at the time of the murders.  At his 1994 trial, Eldridge refused to sit through the punishment phase. A Harris County jury deliberated about 30 minutes before deciding on the death sentence. Records showed Eldridge was sentenced in 1985 to 8 years in prison for attempted murder for shooting a man 8 times. He was released 3 years later, then was returned to prison in 1990 for beating his son. After his parole 4 months later, records showed he tried to kill the boy.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 17, 2009 Virginia Dana Thrall, 25
Robert Finch, 30
Larry Elliott executed
At approximately 4:00 a.m. on the morning of January 2, 2001, Mary Bracewell, a newspaper delivery person, was traveling her route in the Woodbridge community of Prince William County, Virginia. Bracewell was aware that there had been several recent vehicle break-ins in the neighborhood and became suspicious when she saw a man standing beside a pick-up truck parked on Belfry Lane. Bracewell observed the man, who appeared to be carrying a flashlight, walk to the north end of Belfry Lane, cross the street, walk onto a grassy area between two townhouses, and then disappear from her view. Bracewell called police on her cellular telephone to report her observations. At 4:15 a.m., Officer Marshall T. Daniel of the Prince William County Police Department received a radio dispatch directing him to respond to Bracewell's call. He arrived at Belfry Lane three minutes later. Bracewell indicated the parked pick-up truck to Daniel and related to him what she had observed. Daniel noted that the pick-up truck, which was locked, had a Department of Defense windshield identification sticker and that there was a cellular telephone on the passenger seat. At 4:27 a.m., Officer Daniel received a radio call to respond to a report of a domestic disturbance at a townhouse located at 3406 Jousters Way. Jousters Way is located approximately 300 yards north of Belfry Lane. Although the two streets do not intersect, one can reach Jousters Way on foot from Belfry Lane by walking in the same direction that Bracewell had seen the man beside the pick-up truck walking. Tina Miller, who lived in an adjoining townhouse, had made the report of a domestic disturbance at 3406 Jousters Way. Miller telephoned police after being awakened by a crashing sound coming from 3406 Jousters Way at approximately 4:20 a.m. As she placed the call, Miller heard three or four "hollow" sounds followed by "the most horrible scream" she had ever heard. Miller thought that the screaming voice sounded like that of Thrall, one of the occupants of 3406 Jousters Way. Tommy Young, who lived in a townhouse on the opposite side of the street from 3406 Jousters Way, was walking his dog in front of his home at about the same time Miller was awakened by the crashing sound. Young heard two loud "banging noises" coming from 3406 Jousters Way, followed by the sound of a female scream and three more banging noises. Young went back to his house and told his wife to call the police. A few minutes later, Young looked out his front window and saw that the front storm door of 3406 Jousters Way, which had earlier been closed, was swaying back and forth. Young also noted that the front window shades of the home, which were normally left half-drawn, were fully closed. Officer Scott Bigger of the Prince William County Police Department arrived at 3406 Jousters Way at 4:25 a.m. Officer Bigger knocked on the front door, but got no response. Officer Daniel arrived a few minutes later and walked around to the back of the townhouse. The backyard was enclosed by a privacy fence, and Officer Daniel could hear a large dog barking "pretty hysterical, angry" inside the yard. Returning to the front of the home, Officer Daniel observed that Officer Bigger had still received no response to his knocking on the front door. Looking through a gap between the shades of a front window, Officer Daniel was able to see the legs of a person lying prone and motionless in the foyer of the home. Officer Bigger opened the unlocked front door and he and Officer Daniel saw Finch, who lived with Thrall in the home, lying on the floor dead. Finch had suffered three gunshot wounds: one to his head, one to his back, and one to his chest. Officer Daniel immediately returned to the back of the home to secure that area while Officer Bigger waited at the front of the home for additional officers to arrive. When those officers arrived, Officer Daniel immediately returned to the location on Belfry Lane where the pick-up truck had been parked. He arrived at that location at 4:38 a.m. The truck was gone. Officer Sheldon R. Creamer, one of the officers who had responded to the call by the other officers for assistance, arrived at 3406 Jousters Way at approximately 4:45 a.m. Entering the home, he heard "a muffled breathing sound" coming from the kitchen at the back of the home. In the kitchen he found Thrall, shot and lying in a pool of blood. Emergency medical personal called to the scene took Thrall by ambulance to a helicopter, which in turn evacuated her to the Washington Hospital Center in the District of Columbia, where she later died. Thrall had suffered multiple gunshot wounds including a defensive wound to her right hand, three to her head, and one to her chest. She also suffered a blunt force trauma to the back of her head consistent with a pistol-whipping. Officer Creamer found that the backdoor was locked by its doorknob lock, but that the door's deadbolt lock was not engaged. He could hear the dog barking in the back yard. Entering the yard from the kitchen, Officer Creamer found that the dog had calmed down. He then determined that the gate of the privacy fence was secured with a locked padlock. Meanwhile, because Officer Daniel had reported seeing a child looking out of a second floor back window, Officer Bigger reentered the home and went upstairs. There he found Thrall's two sons, aged six and four, who were crying and upset. Police officers removed the children from the home. The Investigation Officer Thomas Leo, a crime scene analyst with the Prince William County Police Department, collected bloodstain samples at various locations inside the townhouse. Subsequent DNA testing of these samples confirmed that the blood was that of Thrall and Finch. Leo also found a bloodstain on the inside of the gate of the privacy fence. Subsequent DNA testing of this sample showed that it was consistent with Larry Bill Elliott's DNA to a degree that a match would occur "once in the entire world population." Although a murder weapon was never recovered, forensic testing of ten bullets recovered from the home and during the autopsies of Thrall and Finch confirmed that all had been fired by the same weapon. The bullets were of a type used only in a revolver-type handgun. Gary Arnsten, a firearms expert with Virginia's Division of Forensic Science, testified at trial that because no weapon of this type could hold more than five or six bullets in its revolving chamber, he was certain that the weapon had been reloaded during the commission of the murders. Detective Charles Hoffman of the Prince William County Police Department spoke with Finch's sister, Jennifer Finch, the day of the murders. She informed Detective Hoffman that Finch had a prior romantic relationship with Rebecca Gragg. She also told him that Finch and Gragg had been involved in a bitter custody dispute over their two children. Detective Hoffman went to Gragg's residence in Dale City, Virginia, located about six miles from the crime scene. Gragg was not at home, but there were two vehicles parked in front of the residence. One of the vehicles was registered in Elliott's name. Gragg returned to her home later that day and was interviewed by two detectives. At that time, Gragg maintained that Elliott was her "friend and business partner." She denied knowing anything about the murders, but stated that Finch had many enemies. The following day, January 3, 2001, Detective Hoffman and another detective traveled to Fort Meade in Hanover, Maryland, where Elliott worked as a civilian employee for the United States Army as a counterintelligence expert. The detectives had learned that Elliott owned a pick-up truck and wanted "to determine whether that truck could, in fact, have been the truck that was seen nearby the [crime] scene." The detectives located the truck in a parking lot at Fort Meade, and Detective Hoffman observed that there was a flashlight, a cellular telephone, and a box of bandages on the seat of the truck. As Detective Hoffman was taking photographs of the truck, Elliott approached him, identified himself as the owner of the truck, and agreed to talk to the detectives. During that conversation, Elliott told the detectives that Gragg was an employee at a brewing company he owned in West Virginia. He admitted that he had supplied Gragg with a credit card in the name of "Rebecca L. Elliott," but maintained that this had been for business purposes. He also told the detectives that he had been traveling over the New Year's holiday, as had Gragg, and that during that time he had spoken with her several times on his cellular telephone in an effort to arrange a business meeting with her. Elliott told the detectives that he was aware that Gragg and Finch were involved in a dispute regarding the custody of their two children. Elliott related that Gragg had traveled to Florida over the New Year's holiday and had taken the children with her. He further related that Gragg had told him that she was having car trouble and would not be able to return to Virginia with the children in time to return them to Finch at 2:00 p.m. on New Year's Day as she was required to do under a visitation agreement. Elliott claimed that he had driven to Gragg's residence in the early afternoon of New Year's Day "in case Robert Finch showed up so that [Elliott] could explain to him the problems Rebecca was having with getting back." Elliott denied he had any relationship with Gragg other than as her employer. He also denied knowing Finch and claimed that he had seen him only once. Although Detective Hoffman told Elliott that his truck had been seen in Finch's neighborhood in the early morning hours of the day of the murders, Elliott denied having been in the area. Elliott claimed that he had spent the night of January first to second sleeping in his truck at a rest area in Maryland. Elliott voluntarily accompanied the detectives to the Anne Arundel County, Maryland Police Department. During the course of an interview there, Elliott admitted the true nature of his involvement with Gragg. He told the detectives that he had initiated a relationship with Gragg in mid-1999 after viewing her photograph on an Internet website called "Adult Friend Finders." In her advertisement, Gragg had indicated that she was looking for a "sugar daddy." During their first meeting, Gragg told Elliott that she had worked as a stripper and "private escort," a euphemism for a "call-girl" prostitute. Gragg told Elliott that she wanted to turn her life around and needed financial support to start a business designing and selling costumes for strippers. She told Elliott that she was not interested in having a romantic or sexual relationship with him. Elliott agreed to this arrangement, saying that he wanted only friendship from Gragg. Elliott subsequently provided Gragg with significant financial support, including paying private school tuition for her children, paying the mortgage on one house Gragg owned in West Virginia and rental on others where she lived with her husband and children at various times, providing her with cars, and permitting her to use his credit cards. Elliott also paid for breast augmentation surgery for Gragg, who had begun operating a pay-to-view pornographic website. Elliott admitted that his support of Gragg had placed a significant financial burden on him and that he had to sell investments to pay her credit card debts. Elliott further admitted that he knew where Finch lived and that, after he had gone to Gragg's house on the afternoon of January 1, 2001, he had driven to Finch's house. He denied getting out of his truck, however, and claimed that he had seen "a black man with a slinky walk going to the front door of the home." Elliott maintained that he had then driven to a large national retail store and a restaurant before driving to the rest stop in Maryland where he had spent the night. He then claimed that he had driven back to Gragg's residence about 3:00 a.m. on the morning of January 2, 2001, to retrieve a case of motor oil that he had seen there the day before. He then went to a convenience store where he called Gragg's cellular telephone on a pay telephone. Elliott claimed that he used the pay telephone because his own cellular telephone's battery had run down. Telephone company records showed that a call had been placed from the pay telephone to Gragg's cellular telephone at 3:28 a.m. on January 2, 2001. Elliott admitted that after calling Gragg, he drove to Finch's neighborhood. He admitted leaving his truck, claiming that he did so only because he needed to urinate. Elliott stated that after urinating by a guardrail on the side of the road, he walked by Thrall's and Finch's townhouse. He denied going onto the property and stated that he had not heard gunshots, a scream, or anything unusual. At the conclusion of this interview, Detective Hoffman took a photograph of an abrasion he had noticed on one of Elliott's hands. On January 4, 2001, Gragg, accompanied by her lawyer, was again interviewed by detectives investigating the murders of Thrall and Finch. During that interview, she admitted receiving a telephone call early on the morning of the murders, but claimed that the call had come from Finch. Gragg claimed that Finch had threatened to call the police if she did not return their children to him that afternoon. Gragg also told the detectives that she did not believe that Elliott had committed the murders. On January 7, 2001, Detective Hoffman conducted another interview with Elliott during which Elliott admitted that he had been in Finch's neighborhood "hundreds of times." He further admitted walking through the neighborhood, but again denied that he had ever been on the property of the townhouse where Thrall and Finch lived. On January 8, 2001, Officer Leo, the crime scene analyst, took possession of Elliott's pick-up truck pursuant to a search warrant. He determined that the interior of the truck had recently been cleaned, noting that the carpet was wet and that the seats and interior had been covered with a "silicone type base cleaner." Nonetheless, testing of samples collected from the underside of the truck's floor mats showed a trace residue of blood, though the samples were too small for accurate DNA testing. A further blood sample found in the seat cushion was consistent with Elliott's DNA. Detectives investigating the murders interviewed Gragg on January 12, 2001 and again on January 19, 2001. She continued to deny any knowledge of the murders. Based on the results of a polygraph examination that Gragg had agreed to take, police suspected that Gragg was not being fully forthcoming, but they were not certain to what extent she had knowledge of the murders or whether she may have been directly involved. Over the next several months, Gragg had continuing contact with the police concerning the investigation of the murders, but she did not provide any additional information concerning Elliott. On May 9, 2001, Elliott was arrested in Maryland and charged with capital murder. At that time, according to Maryland State Police, Elliott was "leaving [in his vehicle] at a high rate of speed," and there was some concern that he was attempting to flee. Elliott claimed, however, that he had intended to turn himself in. On May 10, 2001, Prince William County detectives again interviewed Gragg. During that interview, Gragg agreed to submit to a second polygraph examination. After the polygraph examiner and Detective Hoffman told Gragg that her responses to questions concerning her knowledge of the murders indicated that she was being untruthful, Gragg asked to speak with her attorney. After consulting with her attorney, Gragg told the police that the telephone call she had received early on the morning of the murders was not from Finch, although initially she had assumed it was because the connection was not good and she could not hear the caller clearly. Gragg then related that when the caller realized that she thought she was talking to Finch, the caller said he was "tired of this s*** and was going to take care of it" and hung up. Gragg then realized that the call had come from Elliott. She attempted to call his cellular telephone, but the call was answered by a voice mail system. Gragg told the detectives that she received several more calls on her cellular telephone from Elliott later on January 2, 2001. During one call, Elliott told her that "all of our problems had been taken care of." In another call, Elliott claimed that "Jerry," a cryptic figure Elliott supposedly knew through his work with military counterintelligence, "had come out of nowhere to help him, that he had to go clean up this mess." Later, Elliott told Gragg that he was looking for a place "to dump . . . these bloodied black trash bags from the mess that Jerry had made." Gragg told the police that she had not been truthful in her prior interviews because she was afraid of Elliott and "Jerry," because Elliott had once told her that "Jerry" was watching her and that he would kill her or her family if she went to the police. Once Elliott was in custody and the police had assured her that there was no "Jerry," she stated that she had decided to be truthful. Gragg's attorney confirmed that she had told him on several occasions that she feared Elliott would harm her if she told the police what she knew. Indictment and Pre-trial Proceedings On August 6, 2001, the Prince William County grand jury returned indictments charging Elliott with the capital murder of Thrall, the first degree murder of Finch, and two counts of the use of a firearm in the commission of a felony. Elliott was tried on these indictments initially in a jury trial in July 2002. After the jury had found Elliott guilty and sentenced him to death, the trial court declared a mistrial after it had been determined that a juror had improperly discussed the case with a third party during the trial. After four hours of deliberation, the second jury returned its verdicts, convicting Elliott of the capital murder of Thrall, the first degree murder of Finch, and the two related firearm offenses.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 18, 2009 Texas Geraldine Davidson, 84  Danielle Simpson executed 
Danielle Simpson was charged with the offense of capital murder committed in the course of committing or attempting to commit kidnapping. The evidence admitted during the guilt phase of the trial established that there were three parties to the victim's initial kidnapping: Simpson, Jennifer Simpson, and Simpson's thirteen-year-old cousin, Edward McCoy. All three lived with McCoy's mother and sisters in a house a couple of blocks from Geraldine Davidson's house. Geraldine was an 84-year-old woman who lived alone. She was a former Palestine school teacher and the organist at her Methodist church. Simpson had burglarized Geraldine's house on at least two previous occasions. McCoy testified that, on the morning of the offense in January, 2000, Simpson asked him if he wanted to go with him to burglarize Geraldine's house. McCoy agreed. Simpson, Jennifer, and McCoy all walked around the corner to Geraldine's house. After knocking on the door to see if anyone was home, Simpson went into Geraldine's garage, got a hammer and pick, and broke a window. Jennifer climbed through the window and then went around and opened the door. Once inside, Jennifer took a ring and some money, and Simpson took a watch. About fifteen minutes later Geraldine came home. When Geraldine entered the kitchen, Simpson approached her from behind and held a knife to her neck. He asked Geraldine for money which he then retrieved from her purse. Simpson directed McCoy and Jennifer to restrain Geraldine while he left to get a pillow case and duct tape. When he returned, Simpson taped Geraldine's mouth and bound her hands behind her back and told Jennifer to tape her legs. Simpson then put the pillow case over Geraldine's head, threw her over his shoulder, and carried her outside. Simpson unlocked the trunk of Geraldine's car and placed her inside. The three climbed in Geraldine's car and drove to a couple of different locations to buy drugs. McCoy described Simpson and Jennifer as acting normally and having a good time. After purchasing marijuana and making an unsuccessful attempt to buy some crack cocaine, the three drove about ten miles from Palestine to Grapeland to visit Simpson's aunt and her daughter, Shay. McCoy testified that Simpson opened the trunk and showed Geraldine to Shay. When Geraldine asked for her medicine, Simpson told her to "shut up" and slammed the lid closed. The rest of the afternoon Simpson drove around in Geraldine's car visiting and congregating with various friends in Palestine, occasionally opening the trunk to show off his victim. Jennifer used Geraldine's cell phone throughout the day. The original three parties were eventually joined by Simpson's brother, Lionelle Simpson, who suggested they kill Geraldine. Simpson drove to a dead-end, and all four got out of the car. Simpson removed Geraldine from the trunk, and McCoy stated Simpson "chunked her on the ground." Simpson and Lionelle re-taped Geraldine's arms and legs more tightly than before, beat her, and returned her to the trunk. The four proceeded to the Jack In The Box where they all ate hamburgers and french fries. After leaving the Jack In The Box, they drove to the Neches River, where Simpson and Lionelle had decided to dispose of Geraldine. They backed the car up to the river, opened the trunk, and Lionelle threw Geraldine onto the ground. Getting a running start, Simpson ran up and kicked Geraldine in the face. McCoy's following testimony is similar to the above objected-to hearsay statements: "Then Lionelle got the rope and tied the rope around her legs and he got the other half of the rope and tied it around the brick and threw the brick in the water." Q. Then what happened? A. Then Lionelle got her hands and Simpson got her legs and started swinging her and chunked her in the river." Others testified that later that night, Simpson "rented" them Geraldine's car to use for a couple of hours in exchange for drugs. Also entered into evidence was a letter written by Simpson to a cousin in which Simpson claimed he "was just the watch out person and driver of the car," and accused Jennifer and McCoy of putting Geraldine in the trunk and throwing her in the river. Simpson stated in the letter that he and Lionelle remained in the car. Geraldine Davidson's body was found in the water by a passing motorist. Simpson's co-defendants in the case included his younger brother, Lionelle Simpson; his wife, Jennifer Simpson; McCoy has completed his sentence.  Lionelle Simpson was tried as an adult and is currently serving a life sentence for capital murder. Jennifer Simpson pled guilty after her August 2000 trial had started and was sentenced to life in prison. She will be eligible for parole after serving 30 years of her sentence. UPDATE: Danielle Simpson was executed after his attorneys failed in their attempts to get his execution stopped. Five members of Davidson's family, including her three adult children, witnessed the execution. Simpson said goodbye to his family and attorneys but made no comment to the victim's family. Anderson County District Attorney Doug Lowe, said, "I don't get any pleasure out of the execution of Danielle Simpson but this was a case that deserved that punishment. He was a person who showed no remorse for his victim and had many opportunities throughout the day to spare her life and didn't."
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 19, 2009 Texas Mansoor Bhai Rahim Mohammed   Robert Thompson executed 
In December 1996, Robert Lee Thompson and Sammy Butler robbed a convenience store while armed with handguns. During the robbery, Thompson approached the cash register, pointed his gun at the clerk behind the counter, and demanded money. He shot that first clerk in the stomach when he did not move quickly enough. Then he shot at, but missed, a second clerk, Mansoor Bhai Rahim Mohammed, who was running toward the back of the store. Turning his attention back to the first clerk, who was lying on the floor, he shot him three more times before demanding he get up and give him the money. That first clerk did so, after which Thompson put his handgun to the first clerk's neck and pulled the trigger. Upon discovering he already had fired all of the bullets in that weapon, he hit that first clerk over the head with the cash register drawer. He then fled with Butler. As Thompson drove away, Butler fired his handgun from the passenger window and fatally shot Mansoor (at whom Thompson had previously, unsuccessfully shot). The first clerk survived and testified at Thompson's trial. Thompson's indictment charged he caused the victim's death during the robbery by shooting him with a firearm. At the time of his trial in March 1998, Thompson had three capital murder, and several aggravated robbery, charges pending against him, including the one at hand, stemming from similar robberies. Regarding all of those charges, by the time his counsel was appointed, he had made statements to the police confessing his involvement in all of them. The jury was instructed it could find Thompson guilty of capital murder if he: (1) specifically intended to kill, and did kill, the victim; (2) intended to kill the victim by "soliciting, encouraging, directing, aiding, or attempting to aid" Butler's shooting him during the robbery; or (3) conspired with Butler to commit the robbery and Butler's shooting the victim "was committed in furtherance of the conspiracy and was an offense that Thompson should have anticipated". The jury found him guilty. In response to the jury's answers to the special issues, Thompson was sentenced to death.  
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 26, 2009 Florida Julia Ballentine, 90
Mable Avery, 86
Henry Garcia  died on death row
Julia Ballentine, 90, and her sister Mabel Avery, 86, shared a house in the Leisure City area of Homestead, Florida. On Monday morning, 01/17/83, neighbors became concerned when the sisters did not answer their phone. After knocking on the door and windows and receiving no answer, the neighbors discovered that the rear screen door was slashed open. One of the neighbors entered the house and found a body in each of the bedrooms. Avery had fourteen stab wounds and nine defensive wounds on her arms and hands. Ballentine had thirty stab wounds and twelve defensive wounds, and was sexually assaulted prior to death. The medical examiner testified that the murder occurred in the early morning hours of Sunday, 01/16/83. Feliciano Aguayo, a social and work acquaintance of Henry Garcia, testified that on the evening of 01/15/83, he and Garcia played pool prior to Garcia’s date with a young woman. The woman broke off the date, and Aguayo testified that Garcia was upset and asked Aguayo to drive him to Leisure City. After trying to convince Garcia to go home, Aguayo dropped Garcia off at the Leisure City Lounge. Around 7:00 a.m. on 01/16/83, Aguayo’s mother testified that she saw Garcia running to her house from the direction of the victims’ house, which was half a mile away. Aguayo and his mother both testified that Garcia was covered with fresh blood. Garcia explained that he had been walking in a nearby field when he was attacked by two men and a woman, and that he had stabbed the woman in self-defense. Garcia showed Aguayo the knife, which had drying blood on it and was bent at the tip. Aguayo noted that Garcia had no visible injuries, except for a scratch around his eye. Later that day, Aguayo and his mother drove to the spot where they believed Garcia had been attacked, but could find no signs of a struggle. One of Garcia’s co-workers, Rufina Perez, testified that she overheard Garcia discussing the murder. According to the conversation, Garcia admitted getting into trouble with some women, but that he did not have to worry about them because the women were “already in hell.” When asked how he committed the crime, Garcia said, “I went through the back door and I ripped out the screen door.” In the penalty phase of trial, the State presented evidence of Garcia’s prior criminal history, and used this as an aggravating circumstance. Garcia’s prior criminal history included convictions for assault with intent to rob in 1968, bank robbery and use of a dangerous weapon in May of 1972, mutiny at a U.S. penitentiary in January of 1979, and aggravated battery with the use of a deadly weapon on 07/01/83.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 29, 2009 Florida Nabil Al-Hameli
Emad Al-Tawakuly
Ruth Green
Ronald Grogan
Gerald Johnson
Lester Watson
William Cruse   died on death row
William Cruse was convicted of six murders, resulting in two death sentences for a killing spree he ignited on 04/23/87. Prior to the day of the killings, Cruse obtained a semiautomatic assault rifle and approximately 200 rounds of ammunition. On 04/23/87, he loaded the assault rifle, a shotgun, and a pistol into his car and headed in the direction of Palm Bay Shopping Center. Cruse stopped at his neighbor’s house, the Rich residence, and opened fire, striking 14 year-old John Rich, IV, who was playing basketball outside his home. John’s family rushed outside when they heard the gunshots, and Cruse fired at them as well. Cruse continued to the Publix grocery store in the Palm Bay Shopping Center, where he gathered his firearms and ammunition, and approached the entrance to the store. Cruse shot and killed Nabil Al-Hameli and Emad Al-Tawakuly as they exited the Publix and wounded their friend Faisel Al-Mutairi. Cruse wounded Eric Messerbauer and Douglas Pollack in a spray of bullets, and he killed Ruth Green, who was shot as she pulled her car into the parking lot of the shopping center. Cruse then walked over to the bodies of Al-Hameli and Al-Tawakuly, who were lying on the ground, and shot them again. As authorities approached the scene, Cruse drove over to the Sabal Palm Shopping Center, where he again opened fire on the customers of the Winn Dixie grocery store. Cruse reloaded the rifle and fired numerous shots into Officer Ronald Grogan’s police car as he approached, killing him. Officer Gerald Johnson was the next officer on the scene. Cruse targeted him, wounding him in the leg. As Johnson scrambled for cover, Cruse followed him into the parking lot. Cruse stalked the wounded officer and shot him several more times, killing him. Cruse also fired at the rescue team who were attempting to help the fallen officers. Cruse then went into the Winn Dixie, and hunted down a stream of people who were attempting to escape through the back door of the grocery store. He began firing, wounding many people, and killing Lester Watson with a shot to the back. Cruse re-entered the Winn Dixie and found Judy Larson and Robin Brown hiding in the women’s restroom. Cruse released Larson with orders to tell the police to turn off the lights, while he held Brown hostage in the store. Cruse tried to negotiate with police to bring his car around and let him to leave Brevard County. If they agreed, he would then allow police to kill him. Cruse released Brown several hours later, at which time police fired tear gas and stun grenades into the store. Cruse was arrested when he was forced to leave the store. Additional Information: At trial, Cruse pled not guilty by reason of insanity. He claimed to suffer from delusions that people were talking about him, trying to test his sexuality and attempting to turn him into a homosexual. On 03/20/02, Cruse was found mentally incompetent to proceed in his post conviction relief. Cruse had no prior incarceration history in the state of Florida. 
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
November 30, 2009 Ohio Tryna Middleton, 14 Romell Broom   stayed 
Romell Broom was convicted in the 1984 slaying of Tryna Middleton after abducting her at knifepoint in Cleveland as she walked home from a Friday night football game with two friends. Tryna Middleton's mother, father and aunt planned to witness the execution on her behalf. On September 21, 1984, Tryna Middleton and two friends, Tammy Sims and Bonita Callier were at a high school football game. Middleton was fourteen years old at the time, and she was a ninth-grade student at the high school. After the football game, the three girls began walking home, and they noticed a car that they thought looked suspicious. They walked away from the car and down a different street. A car without its lights on then came towards the girls and stopped in front of them; the driver exited the car and ran past the girls. Once the girls passed by the parked car, they heard footsteps behind them and then an assailant tried to grab all of them. In the course of the struggle with the girls, the assailant said, "Come here, bitch," and he pulled out a knife. Middleton was not able to get away from the assailant, but the other two girls escaped. They ran to a nearby house where the homeowner allowed them to call their mothers and the police. The girls described the car and the assailant to the police. Approximately two hours later, Tryna's body was found in a parking lot; she had been stabbed in the chest and abdomen and there were sperm cells found in her rectum and vagina. Her friends were shown a series of photographs, but were unable to identify a suspect at this point. There were two other incidents in the same area involving young girls. On September 18, 1984, a girl was walking home when a car passed her and then stopped. When she walked past the car, the driver got out and grabbed her. He also threatened her with a knife, and he called her a "bitch." Residents who lived nearby heard the noise, and the girl was able to escape into their home. The other incident occurred on December 6, 1984, involving another girl. A car was following her as she was walking home, and as she turned a street corner, a man passed her and then grabbed her from behind. The assailant began hitting the girl, and he threw her into his car. Her younger sister observed what happened and summoned the girls' mother, who ran outside and grabbed the car door. As her mother held on to the car, the girl was able to escape through the passenger door. Two witnesses were able to get the license plate number of the car, which the police then traced to William Broom, Broom's father. When the police arrived, Broom admitted that he had been driving the car. The police then took Broom to the hospital, where both the girl and her mother identified him as the assailant. The other two witnesses to the incident also identified Broom in a line-up. The similarities between these three incidents led the police to bring in the witnesses from the other two cases to view a line-up. The victims and witnesses each independently identified Broom from the line-up; Tryna's friends also identified him in a photo array. The police discovered that Broom had been driving his girlfriend's car before it was wrecked on November 6, 1984, and one of the girls identified Broom's girlfriend's car as the one from the night of the attack on Tryna. The other girl stated that it was the same kind and color as the car used during the incident. Tests revealed that the sperm discovered in Tryna's body belonged to a person with type B blood, which is the blood type of approximately twelve percent of the population; Broom's blood is type B. A Cuyahoga County grand jury issued an indictment charging Broom with the following: (1) aggravated murder of Tryna Middleton with specifications for murder committed during the course of a kidnapping and rape; (2) rape of Tryna Middleton; (3) kidnapping of Tryna Middleton; (4, 5, 6, 7) kidnapping of the surviving victims; and (8) felonious assault of one of the surviving victims. Counts Six through Eight were severed, and Broom was tried on the first five counts in proceedings that began on September 16, 1985. The jury found Broom guilty on each of the charges, and at the end of the penalty phase, recommended a sentence of death. The state trial judge sentenced Broom to death in October 1985, for aggravated murder. In addition, Broom was sentenced to 54-80 years of incarceration for the remaining counts. "It's been twenty-five years and the pain has gotten a little bit better, but there is not a single day that I don't get up and think about her during some point in the day," said Bessye Middleton, Tryna's mother. 
 

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