December 2010 Executions
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One killer was executed in December 2010. He had murdered at least 1 person.
Four
killers were given a stay in December 2010. They have murdered at least 6 people.
Two killers died on death row while awaiting execution in December 2010. They had murdered at least 2 people.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 1, 2010 Texas Robert Read
James Davis 
 
Steven Staley stayed
In April 1991, Steven Kenneth Staley was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for the murder of Robert Read during an armed robbery in October 1989. Steven Kenneth Staley, Tracy Duke and Brenda Rayburn went to a west Fort Worth Steak and Ale on October 14, 1989, to rob the restaurant at gunpoint. The trio had dinner and desert, then Staley and Duke pulled semiautomatic pistols from Rayburn’s purse and rounded up employees. Staley forced restaurant manager Robert Read to open the cash registers and the safe and stuff money into a briefcase. In the confusion, an assistant manager slipped out a rear door and called police. Police arrived during the robbery, so Staley, Duke and Rayburn took Read, who had offered himself as a hostage instead of his employees and hijacked a car about a block away from the restaurant. As the car sped away, police heard several gunshots. During the chase, the robbers tossed out of the car a briefcase containing some of the stolen money and both semiautomatic pistols. The car broke down, and the three robbers tried to flee. All were captured. In the back seat of the stolen car, police found Read’s body. The medical examiner testified that Read had been struck with a blunt object on the forehead. Read had also been shot three times, including once in the right temple. Staley had a prior criminal record which included a vicious attack on a man who was selling a car. In March 1984, Staley and a friend answered a classified ad for a Camaro in Denver, Colorado. During a test drive of the vehicle, Staley’s friend kicked the owner in the back of the head, smashed his face against the windshield, and forced him out of the car at gunpoint. About five months later, Staley answered another ad for a Camaro. Again, he and the owner went for a test drive. When they reached a secluded area, Staley pulled a gun on the owner and told him to start running. Staley fled in the car. Staley also was implicated in the death of James Davis, a fellow inmate at the Denver correctional center from which Staley escaped on September 18, 1989, just a month before Robert Read's murder. Davis disappeared from the correctional center two days after Staley escaped. Davis’s body was found about a month later, with a fatal gunshot wound to the head and another gunshot wound to the back. Staley acknowledged helping Duke kill Davis, but named Duke as the gunman. Brenda Rayburn received a 30 year sentence in exchange for her testimony.  Duke pled guilty to 1 count of murder for Robert's death and 2 counts of attempted capital murder for shooting at the police officers and received three life sentences. In February 2006, Steven Staley won a stay from state district judge Wayne Salvant. Staley's lawyer's argued that Staley was mentally ill and unable to fully appreciate the severity of the punishment. In March of 2005, Staley was just hours from execution when he won a similar reprieve. However, psychiatric examinations have shown that Staley fully understands that he is to be executed for the killing Robert Read.  UPDATE: Steve Staley has again won a reprieve, courtesy of state district judge Wayne Salvant. After issuing a stay of execution in 2006, Salvant ordered that Staley be forcibly given anti-psychotic medication. In September 2010, pending defense appeals were denied and Salvant set a new execution date for December 1. Salvant has granted a defense request to postpone a hearing to determine Staley's competency to be executed. Defense attorney Jack Strickland has asked for more time to find a mental health expert to counter the opinion of a state expert who has already examined Staley. Additionally, Strickland will no longer be able to serve as Staley's attorney because he is returning to the district attorney's office in January 2011. Another attorney will appointed to represent Staley and appeals are expected to continue in this case for another four to six years.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 1, 2010 Tennessee Paula Jeffers, 7  Billy Irick stayed 
In April 1985, Billy Ray Irick was living with Kenneth Jeffers in Kenneth's mother's home in Knoxville, Tennessee. On the morning of April 15, Irick got into an argument with Kenneth's mother, and she chased him out of the house with a broom, telling him not to return. Later that day, around noon, Kenneth drove Irick to Irick's former workplace so he could pick up his final paycheck. Kenneth then took Irick to a convenience store, where Irick bought a quart of beer. After picking up Darrell Easterly, a mutual friend, the men went to the home of Kathy Jeffers, Kenneth's estranged wife. A couple of hours later, Kenneth picked up Kathy's children from school and took Easterly home. He later drove Irick to a nearby store so Irick could buy a second quart of beer, and the two then returned to Kathy's house. That evening, around 9:00 p.m., Kenneth left to run some errands and visit some friends. Kathy put the children, including her 7-year-old daughter Paula, to bed and began getting ready for work. She noticed that Irick was on the back porch muttering to himself.  Before she left, Kathy spoke with Irick for a few minutes in the kitchen. He "seemed mad" about the argument with Kenneth's mother and said that he could not hitchhike to Virginia that night as he wanted to because Kenneth had asked him to "watch the kids." Kathy, who did not have a telephone in her home, briefly left the house to use a nearby pay phone to try to call Kenneth. When she could not reach him, she returned and assured Irick that she would send Kenneth to her house to watch the children. She then left for work, arriving at the truck stop restaurant where she was a waitress at about 10:30 p.m. Kenneth came into the truck stop at about the same time, and she told him that she had "a bad feeling" about leaving Irick with the children and that she wanted Kenneth to go to the house and stay with the children instead. Kenneth laughed off her concern and promised that he would go check on them later. Around midnight, Irick knocked on the door of Kathy's elderly neighbor, Wallace Bailey. When Ms. Bailey refused to open the door, Irick implored: "Well, it's an emergency. I want to use the phone. Paula is bleeding. I can't get her to wake up and breathe, and I want to use your phone."  Ms. Bailey put the telephone on the porch, and Irick called Kenneth, telling him: "Kenny, come home. It's Paula. I can't wake her up." After the call, Ms. Bailey watched Irick walk back to Kathy's house, where he kicked a bucket and a little dog sitting on the porch, and then punched the porch post, saying loudly "Damn." Bailey asked Irick why he did not call an ambulance, and Irick responded in a subdued voice: "I think it's too late for that." When Kenneth arrived at Kathy's house, he found Irick standing at the front door. Kenneth ran up the front steps to see Paula lying on the living room floor, blood between her legs. He wrapped the child in a blanket, carried her to his car, and sped to the hospital. After laboring for 45 minutes to resuscitate Paula, hospital personnel declared her dead at approximately 1:15 am. An autopsy would later reveal that Paula had been raped vaginally and anally, then asphyxiated. That afternoon, a police officer found Irick hitchhiking on an interstate entrance ramp. In a recorded conversation with police and also in writing, Irick confessed to raping and murdering Paula. A jury found Irick guilty of felony murder and two counts of aggravated rape. Following the penalty phase of the trial, the jury returned a death sentence based on four aggravating circumstances: 1) the victim was less than 12 years of age and the defendant was 18 years of age or older; 2) the murder was especially heinous, atrocious, or cruel in that it involved torture or depravity of mind; 3) the murder was committed for the purpose of avoiding, interfering with, or preventing Irick's lawful arrest or prosecution; and 4) Irick committed the murder while he was engaged in committing the felony of rape.  UDPATE: This execution was stayed  to appeal Tennessee's lethal injection procedure.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 3, 2010 Florida Angeli Bare, 12 Robert Power died on death row
 In June of 1979, Robert Beeler Power was arrested in South Carolina after stealing a U-Haul truck. He was given five years suspended sentence and two years probation. In September of 1979, Power was arrested for Armed Robbery in Port St. Lucy, Florida. He pled no contest and served two years in prison. Power was on parole in Florida when he was arrested for forging checks in July of 1982 in California. He was given a three-year prison sentence, during which time he escaped from a hospital where he was being treated for depression. In September of 1982, Power was arrested for stealing a car. Power was sentenced to prison and was released in 1985 for a work release program. Power then left California while still on parole and moved to Florida. On October 6, 1987, Frank Miller drove to the Bare family’s house as he routinely did to pick up Angeli Bare, who was 12-years-old, and take her to school with his daughter. He arrived at the house and honked the horn twice. A man standing in the doorway of the house with his back to the street motioned for Mr. Miller to wait. Mr. Miller assumed the man was Mr. Bare. The door to the house closed. At approximately 8:55 a.m., Angeli approached the car. She stood approximately three feet from the car on the passenger side, which was the side of the car closest to the house. Angeli appeared nervous and stated that there was a man in the house who wanted to rob her. Mr. Miller tried to persuade Angeli to get into the car, but Angeli stated that the man said that he would kill all three of them. Mr. Miller told Angeli that he would get help. Mr. Miller drove four blocks to his house, where he called both 911 and the Bares at work. Mr. Miller then drove back to the Bare’s house, only this time he parked his car four to five houses away. Deputy Richard Welty was dispatched to the Bare home. Mr. Miller flagged him down and related what he had seen. Mr. Miller described a white man with reddish hair. The Bares had arrived at the scene and Mrs. Bare told Deputy Welty that Angeli’s biological father had red hair, but he lived in California. Deputy Welty searched the Bare’s home and found no one. He began to search the field behind the house. He had his service revolver in one hand and his radio in the other. When his footing became unstable, Deputy Welty holstered his service revolver. He then noticed a white male with sandy blond hair casually walking through the field. The man was heading toward a construction site that was near the field and was holding a sandwich in his right hand. Deputy Welty requested a better description of the man Mr. Miller had seen via his radio. He looked down to attain better footing and, when he looked up, the man who had been walking through the field was pointing a gun at him. Deputy Welty later identified the man as Robert Power. Power requested that Deputy Welty hand over his service revolver. He then asked Deputy Welty to put his hands in the air, and Power proceeded to get the gun himself. Power then asked Deputy Welty, “How many others are there?” Deputy Welty responded that there were six other deputies on the scene. Power then took Deputy Welty’s radio and told him to run toward the construction site. Power told Deputy Welty “if you turn around I will kill you.” Deputy Welty ran about 30 feet, stopped and looked back. He saw Power running toward the freeway. Deputy Welty informed the deputies at the house that Power had his radio and service revolver. Power was not apprehended. Angeli’s body was found in the field in the general vicinity that Power had fled. She was lying on her side and was hogtied by the wrists and the ankles. She was nude from the waist down. The autopsy revealed a blackened left eye and a superficial contusion on the neck. There were injuries to the vaginal and anal area due to the insertion of an oversized foreign object. There was no semen found on the victim’s underwear, and no sperm were found on the body. The approximate time of death was within 30 minutes of 9:15 a.m. Angeli’s death was due to shock because of the severance of the right carotid artery. The bloodstains on the victim’s underwear matched the victim’s blood type. There were no signs of a struggle at the Bare home. Angeli’s bank had been pried open with a screwdriver that was found in the sink. Deputy Welty’s gun was recovered. The prints on Deputy Welty’s revolver did not match Power’s fingerprints. There were no prints found on the victim’s body. Hairs found on the bed sheets from the victim’s bed and on the victim’s pubic area were the same as Power’s pubic hairs. There were also a number of hairs found on the bed sheets from an unknown origin that remained unidentified at the trial. Deputy Welty was able to identify Power from a photograph. On 10/16/87, a search warrant was issued and the home in which Power resided was searched. Power was found hiding in the attic and was arrested. The officer found a maroon duffle bag in the attic which contained a pistol, ammunition, a folding knife and documents with Power’s name on them. A box in one of the bedrooms was found to contain various parts of mechanical items. One of the parts had a serial number that matched the serial number on Deputy Welty’s radio. A couple of hooded sweatshirts were seized from the residence. Hairs found on the sweatshirts matched the victim’s head hair.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 16, 2010 Oklahoma Curtis Wise, 22  John Duty executed 
John David Duty was imprisoned in August 1978 after being convicted of armed robbery, kidnapping, first degree rape and shooting with intent to kill. In December 2001, the 49-year-old Duty was placed on the disciplinary "H-unit" after being found with contraband. On December 13, 2001, prison officials placed twenty-two-year-old Wise in the same cell with Duty. On the evening of December 19, Wise allowed Duty to bind him from behind to fake an altercation so Duty would be moved to administrative segregation. While Wise was bound, Duty strangled him to death with a bed sheet. Approximately one hour later, Duty wrote a letter to Wise's mother which stated: "Mary Wise, Well by the time you get this letter you will already know that your son is dead. I know now because I just killed him an hour ago. Gee you'd think I'd be feeling some remorse but I'm not. I've been planning since the day he moved in last Friday.  Tonight I finally pulled it off. Would you like to know how I did it? Well I told him I wanted to use him as a hostage. Hell he went right for it, thinking he was gonna get some smokes out of the deal. Well I tied him up hands and feet, then I strangled him. It's not like the movies, it took awhile. But I really did him a favor as he was to stupid to live. I mean he didn't know me 5 days and he let me tie him up like that, Please! Besides he was young and dumb and would've just been in and out of prison his whole life. So I saved him all the torment. I've been in 24 years, wish someone would have done me the same favor back then. I guess you're thinking I'll be punished for this. Well not likely in this county. The DA's here are weak bitches and don't give a damn about deaths of inmates. We're all just scum to them. Besides I'm doing 2 life sentences so they can't hurt me. But you can call them and tell them about this letter, but it wouldn't do you any good. Well I'm gonna close for now and I'll tell police in the morning about Curtis." Investigator Tim Coppick interviewed Duty the morning after the murder. Duty told the investigator he wrote the letter and mailed it. The investigator alerted the warden and the letter was intercepted before it left the prison. At some point after the murder, Duty wrote a letter to the district attorney inquiring "whether you intend to file murder charges against me or not." Duty stated: "Now I have a proposition for you. I'm willing to come over there right now and plead guilty to a Murder 1 charge. But that's only if you do it immediately. After that you can just spend the money for a jury trial. But here's my deal. I do it only for a death sentence. I'm never getting out of here with the time I'm doing. And with all my bad behavior in here I'm never going to make parole. So there's no time you can give me that would harm me in the least way. And because of my violent record you can't say I don't deserve the death penalty. I've killed another inmate, taken hostages 3 times, and assaulted a guard. Plus other various things to numerous to mention. You may think me crazy for this, and yes I'm guess I am a bit crazy or I'd not have done things I've done. But I'm totally sane and know what I'm doing, and am prepared to face my punishment which I rightfully deserve. Now if you don't do this you're only telling me it's ok for me to kill again again because you're not gonna do anything to me. And if that's what it takes to get you to do something then I'll be more than happy to do it. Only next time it will be a guard or staff member, as I know you'll prosecute me then . . . . So the ball is in your corner, are you going to do your job or do you allow me to continue on doing mine." Duty was charged with first degree murder. The State sought the death penalty and filed a bill of particulars listing four aggravating factors: (1) Duty was previously convicted of prior violent felonies; (2) the murder was especially heinous, atrocious and cruel; (3) Duty was a continuing threat to society; and (4) the murder occurred while Duty was incarcerated. Duty pled guilty to premeditated murder. The State called two witnesses, the mother of the victim, Mary Wise, and Dr. Williams. Ms. Wise begged the judge to sentence Duty to life without parole, stating: I don't believe he ought to have a choice. I think he ought to sit in that cell  and face those four walls and think about what he did for the rest of his natural-born life. And I hope and pray to God that you live to be 110 years old, because that's how long I want you to think about what you did. Dr. Williams testified Duty emphatically told him he intended to continue killing if he remained in prison. After the State presented its evidence, the court again received assurances from Duty that he did not want to present evidence. His counsel waived closing argument. The district court recognized the sincerity of Ms. Wise's wishes, but nonetheless sentenced Duty to death. The court explained Duty's felony record and his intent to kill again made the case a "textbook case for the death penalty." 
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 1, 2010 Texas Robert Read
James Davis 
 
Steven Staley stayed
In April 1991, Steven Kenneth Staley was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death for the murder of Robert Read during an armed robbery in October 1989. Steven Kenneth Staley, Tracy Duke and Brenda Rayburn went to a west Fort Worth Steak and Ale on October 14, 1989, to rob the restaurant at gunpoint. The trio had dinner and desert, then Staley and Duke pulled semiautomatic pistols from Rayburn’s purse and rounded up employees. Staley forced restaurant manager Robert Read to open the cash registers and the safe and stuff money into a briefcase. In the confusion, an assistant manager slipped out a rear door and called police. Police arrived during the robbery, so Staley, Duke and Rayburn took Read, who had offered himself as a hostage instead of his employees and hijacked a car about a block away from the restaurant. As the car sped away, police heard several gunshots. During the chase, the robbers tossed out of the car a briefcase containing some of the stolen money and both semiautomatic pistols. The car broke down, and the three robbers tried to flee. All were captured. In the back seat of the stolen car, police found Read’s body. The medical examiner testified that Read had been struck with a blunt object on the forehead. Read had also been shot three times, including once in the right temple. Staley had a prior criminal record which included a vicious attack on a man who was selling a car. In March 1984, Staley and a friend answered a classified ad for a Camaro in Denver, Colorado. During a test drive of the vehicle, Staley’s friend kicked the owner in the back of the head, smashed his face against the windshield, and forced him out of the car at gunpoint. About five months later, Staley answered another ad for a Camaro. Again, he and the owner went for a test drive. When they reached a secluded area, Staley pulled a gun on the owner and told him to start running. Staley fled in the car. Staley also was implicated in the death of James Davis, a fellow inmate at the Denver correctional center from which Staley escaped on September 18, 1989, just a month before Robert Read's murder. Davis disappeared from the correctional center two days after Staley escaped. Davis’s body was found about a month later, with a fatal gunshot wound to the head and another gunshot wound to the back. Staley acknowledged helping Duke kill Davis, but named Duke as the gunman. Brenda Rayburn received a 30 year sentence in exchange for her testimony.  Duke pled guilty to 1 count of murder for Robert's death and 2 counts of attempted capital murder for shooting at the police officers and received three life sentences. In February 2006, Steven Staley won a stay from state district judge Wayne Salvant. Staley's lawyer's argued that Staley was mentally ill and unable to fully appreciate the severity of the punishment. In March of 2005, Staley was just hours from execution when he won a similar reprieve. However, psychiatric examinations have shown that Staley fully understands that he is to be executed for the killing Robert Read.  UPDATE: Steve Staley has again won a reprieve, courtesy of state district judge Wayne Salvant. After issuing a stay of execution in 2006, Salvant ordered that Staley be forcibly given anti-psychotic medication. In September 2010, pending defense appeals were denied and Salvant set a new execution date for December 1. Salvant has granted a defense request to postpone a hearing to determine Staley's competency to be executed. Defense attorney Jack Strickland has asked for more time to find a mental health expert to counter the opinion of a state expert who has already examined Staley. Additionally, Strickland will no longer be able to serve as Staley's attorney because he is returning to the district attorney's office in January 2011. Another attorney will appointed to represent Staley and appeals are expected to continue in this case for another four to six years.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 29, 2010 Mississippi Robert C. "Bert" Bell  Frederick Bell stayed
On May 6, 1991, Bert Bell was working as the store clerk at Sparks Stop-and-Go in Grenada County. That day Frederick Bell accompanied by Anthony Joe Doss, Robert Kennedy James, and Frank Coffey purchased beer and potato chips from Bert. The two Bells are not related. The four exited the store, sat at a nearby picnic table and talked. Planning to go to Memphis, Bell said that he needed money. Bell announced that he was going to rob the store and showed the group a .22 caliber pistol. Doss also had in his possession a gun, which turned out to be inoperable. Refusing to take part, James and Coffey departed the premises as the other two went back into the store. Minutes later, James and Coffey heard hollering accompanied by gunshots. When Bell and Doss caught up with the other two, they showed them items they had taken from the store, including a money bag, .38 caliber pistol and a box of bullets. Because he did not want any witnesses, Bell then threatened to kill James. Coffey and Doss stepped in to prevent this. Both James and Coffey testified that Bell said he shot Bert. Later that day, Bernard Gladney drove Bell, Doss, and Coffey to Memphis. On the way, Bell again stated that he wanted to kill James to prevent him from telling anyone about the murder. Eventually, Bell was arrested in Memphis on another crime. Two guns were found in the house where he was arrested, a third was found in Gladney’s vehicle. Bell maintained that he was in Memphis the day of the murder. However, there were no witnesses to corroborate his alibi. Both James’s sister and Coffey’s girlfriend testified that they saw Bell with Coffey, Doss and James the day of the murder. The store owner, James Shelby Sparks, testified that a .38 caliber pistol (which was later recovered during Bell’s arrest), a box of shells, and a money bag were taken from the store during the robbery. An autopsy revealed that Bert was shot several times. Ballistics tests showed that Bert was shot with the .38 and a smaller caliber gun, likely a .22 caliber. Following the trial, on January 26, 1993, the jury found Bell guilty of capital murder and sentenced him to death. Doss was also sentenced to death.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
December 29, 2010 Florida Joel Good Eddie Sexton died on death row
Joel Good was married to Pixie Sexton, the daughter of Eddie and Estella Sexton. Joel’s body and the body of Joel and Pixie’s son were each buried near Tampa area campsites. Sexton and his family moved to Florida from Ohio because Sexton was wanted on charges of sexual abuse in Ohio. The family temporarily stayed with Sexton’s sister in Tampa, but then moved to Hillsborough State Park, where they lived in a mobile home. During this time, Pixie and Joel’s infant son, Skipper Lee Good, fell ill, but Sexton would not allow them to take their son to the doctor for fear of being found. Sexton also threatened to hurt their son if Pixie did not make the baby stop crying. Pixie covered the baby’s face until he stopped crying. The baby was found dead in the morning, and Sexton made Joel Good and Sexton’s son, William Sexton, bury the body in the woods. Joel wanted to go back to Ohio with Pixie and her two daughters after the death of his son. Pixie, at this point, informed Joel that Eddie Sexton, her father, was also the father of her two daughters and Sexton would not allow them to return to Ohio. He threatened to turn in Pixie for killing her son if they left. During this period of time, the Sexton family moved to Little Manatee State Park. Eddie Sexton had William Sexton, his son, kill Joel Good because Eddie Sexton was afraid that Joel Good would tell the police about the infant’s death, the sexual abuse, and the location of Sexton and his family. William, who was 22-years-old, was later found to function on the level of an 8-year-old. On 11/17/93, some members of the Sexton family, including Eddie Sexton, went on a picnic. Other members of the family stayed at the campsite, including Pixie Good, Joel Good, and William Sexton. Pixie testified that William and Joel left the campsite and went into the woods. Pixie and her sister, Sherry Sexton, went to look for them when they heard Joel shout. According to Pixie, they found William strangling Joel with a rope. Pixie went and found her father, Eddie Sexton, bringing him to where William and Joel were in the woods. Sexton saw that Joel was still moving and told William to finish killing Joel. Eddie and William Sexton buried the body of Joel Good with a shovel that Eddie Sexton sent Pixie to buy. Eddie Sexton told William Sexton to cut off Joel Good’s hands so that there would not be fingerprints, but William was not able to cut off his hands. The state’s medical examiner observed ligature marks around the Joel Good’s neck and a deep cut on his right hand. She concluded that the victim was strangled to death. Sherry Sexton, however, gave a different account of the events surrounding Joel Good’s death. She testified that Pixie helped William kill Joel Good. Sherry also reported that Eddie Sexton was upset with William for killing Joel and that Pixie said she was glad Joel was dead. The FBI tracked the Sexton family to the Little Manatee River Campground. The FBI were investigating the Sexton family due to the charges of sexual misconduct of the Sexton parents against their children and the charges of unlawful flight to avoid prosecution in Ohio. Eddie Sexton made a phone call to his brother-in-law in Indiana and charged the call to his previous number in Ohio. The FBI determined that the call was placed from a pay phone in the Little Manatee River State Park. The FBI also determined that the Sexton family was probably driving a gray 1993 Nissan Sentra that Eddie Sexton had bought from his brother-in-law but had not made the payments; therefore, Sexton’s brother-in-law reported the automobile as stolen. The FBI in Ohio contacted the FBI in Tampa and gave them the information about the location of the Sexton family and their automobile. On 01/14/94, the FBI located the Sexton family at the Little Manatee River State Park. The FBI maintained surveillance on the Sexton family and arrested Eddie and Estella Sexton when they left the campsite in the automobile. The Stark County Sheriff’s Department questioned Charles Sexton, a son of Eddie and Estella Sexton, after Joel Good’s aunt reported Joel Good missing. Charles Sexton told them that Joel Good and Skipper Good were both dead. He showed officials the burial locations for both Joel and Skipper Good. Additionally, Eddie Sexton conspired with family members, specifically his son Willie Sexton, to murder a campground resident, Raymond Hesser. Eddie Sexton wanted to assume the identity of Hesser due to Sexton’s fugitive status. The Sexton family also planned to take Hesser’s camper and truck after he was dead. After killing Hesser, the Sextons would dispose of his body in the Little Manatee River State Park. The arrest of members of the Sexton family, including Eddie and Willie Sexton, prevented the completion of the Hesser murder. Eddie Sexton was sentenced to 30 years for Conspiracy to Commit First-Degree Murder on 11/02/94. 
 

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