August 2014 Executions
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Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
August 6, 2014 Ohio Debra D. Ogle
Cynthia Tincher     
William Montgomery stayed 

On February 20, 1986, Montgomery purchased a Bursa .380 automatic handgun from Cleland's Gun Shop in Toledo, Ohio. This gun was subsequently identified as the weapon that was used to kill both Ogle and Tincher. At approximately 5:00 a.m. on March 8, 1986, after an apparent argument with his girlfriend, [Montgomery went by taxi with Glover Heard to an apartment shared by Ogle and Tincher.  [Montgomery was acquainted with the victims but Heard was not.   At this time, [Montgomery was wearing a dark blue pinstriped suit jacket that he had borrowed from Randolph Randleman, his uncle.   Subsequently, [Montgomery asked Ogle to give him a ride home.   After Ogle agreed, she, [Montgomery and Heard left in her car.   Before arriving at the destination, however, [Montgomery had Ogle stop the car.   He then walked her into a wooded area along Hill Avenue in Toledo, Ohio, while Heard remained in Ogle's car, and then, for no apparent reason, [Montgomery shot Ogle three times with the fatal wound inflicted while the gun was in direct contact with the top of her forehead.  [Montgomery then returned to the car and he and Heard drove back to the girls' apartment.  [Montgomery instructed Heard to take Ogle's car.   Heard took the car but then abandoned it approximately one block from his residence.  [Montgomery returned to the girls' apartment and shortly thereafter left with Cynthia Tincher in her car.   After leaving the apartment, [Montgomery had Tincher pull to the side of the road and thereupon shot her through the head from a range of twelve inches or less.   Several witnesses testified that they saw a man of approximately [Montgomery's height and weight leaving Tincher's car on the morning of March 8, 1986 at approximately 7:15.   Those witnesses testified, however, that the person they saw was wearing a dark jacket with a hood pulled up around his face.   Tincher's body was discovered in her car at the corner of Wenz and Angola Roads in Toledo, Ohio at approximately 7:30 a.m. on March 8, 1986.  [Montgomery lives approximately one-half mile from that location.   Thereafter, at approximately 12:00 noon on March 8, 1986, [Montgomery, Heard and two friends, Sidney Armstead and Eric Wilson, got together to go to a mall.  [Montgomery, however, was carrying a plastic bag and directed Armstead to first drive him to a dry cleaner.   Armstead drove appellant to One Hour Martinizing where [Montgomery got out of the car with the bag.   Although they were unable to identify [Montgomery, employees of the laundry testified that on March 8, 1986, a black male showed them a soaking wet dark blue pin-striped suit jacket that he wanted cleaned in one hour.   The employees explained that the jacket would have to dry out before it could be cleaned.   They then hung the jacket to dry.   One employee testified that as it dried, the jacket made a “brownish dripping mess on the floor.”   She further testified that the jacket was badly stained and that she had to clean the jacket three times using a chemical cleaner.   She could not identify, however, what the stains were.   Subsequently, the jacket was picked up.   Several days later, police officers obtained the jacket from Randolph Randleman who identified the jacket in court as the one which he had loaned to [Montgomery.

As stated above, on March 8, 1986 at approximately 7:30 a.m., Tincher's body was discovered in her car at the corner of Wenz and Angola.   Soon thereafter, Ogle was listed as missing.   The following day, however, Ogle's car was discovered behind an abandoned house at 1031 Norwood.   Thereafter, on March 10, 1986, Crime Stoppers received a telephone call from a Michael Clark who was at that time incarcerated in the Lucas County Jail. Upon interviewing Clark, officers obtained the name of Glover Heard.   Officers located Heard and from Heard they obtained the name of [Montgomery.   Officers then gained permission from [Montgomery's mother to search her home, where appellant also lived.   That search revealed a black leather jacket with a hood and the manual to the Bursa semi-automatic handgun.   Subsequently, on March 12, 1986, officers went to Randolph Randleman's home in an attempt to locate [Montgomery.   At approximately 12:00 noon, [Montgomery arrived at the home and told officers that he knew the officers were looking for him and he wanted to talk about the homicide.   He was then arrested and taken to the police station for questioning.   During the interrogation, [Montgomery initially stated that Heard had killed both girls with his, [Montgomery's, gun.   He then changed his story but ultimately admitted that he had gone to the girls' apartment for a ride home.   He continued to insist, however, that Heard had killed the girls and that he did not know where Ogle's body was.   Finally, however, [Montgomery admitted that he might be able to show officers where Ogle's body was and stated that it was on Hill Avenue near a market.   Officers then took [Montgomery to Hill Avenue and ultimately to a wooded area that appellant identified as the location.   Several officers began searching the area while Sergeant Larry Przeslawski stayed in a patrol vehicle with [Montgomery.   After the officers searched one wooded area for a few minutes, [Montgomery told Sergeant Przeslawski to direct the officers to search a different wooded area.   Within five minutes, the officers located the body of Debra Ogle.

At the conclusion of the trial, the jury found [Montgomery guilty of the aggravated murder of Debra Ogle with the specifications that said action involved the purposeful killing of two or more persons and that [Montgomery was the principal offender while attempting to commit aggravated robbery.   The jury further found [Montgomery guilty of the lesser included offense of murder of Cynthia Tincher.   At the conclusion of the mitigation phase, the jury recommended that [Montgomery be sentenced to death.   The trial court agreed with the jury's recommendation and ordered that appellant be executed․

- See more at: http://caselaw.findlaw.com/us-6th-circuit/1105525.html#sthash.FQmmaFqM.dpuf
On February 20, 1986, William Montgomery purchased a Bursa .380 automatic handgun from Cleland's Gun Shop in Toledo, Ohio. This gun was subsequently identified as the weapon that was used to kill both Debra Ogle and Cynthia Tincher. At approximately 5:00 am on March 8, 1986, after an apparent argument with his girlfriend, Montgomery went by taxi with Glover Heard to an apartment shared by Ogle and Tincher. Montgomery was acquainted with the victims but Heard was not. At this time, Montgomery was wearing a dark blue pinstriped suit jacket that he had borrowed from Randolph Randleman, his uncle. Subsequently, Montgomery asked Debra Ogle to give him a ride home. After Debra agreed, she, Montgomery and Heard left in her car. Before arriving at the destination, however, Montgomery had Debra stop the car. He then walked her into a wooded area along Hill Avenue in Toledo, Ohio, while Heard remained in Debra Ogle's car, and then, for no apparent reason, Montgomery shot Debra three times with the fatal wound inflicted while the gun was in direct contact with the top of her forehead. Montgomery then returned to the car and he and Heard drove back to the girls' apartment.  Montgomery instructed Heard to take Debra Ogle's car. Heard took the car but then abandoned it approximately one block from his residence. Montgomery returned to the girls' apartment and shortly thereafter left with Cynthia Tincher in her car. After leaving the apartment, Montgomery had Cynthia pull to the side of the road and thereupon shot her through the head from a range of twelve inches or less. Several witnesses testified that they saw a man of approximately Montgomery's height and weight leaving Cynthia's car on the morning of March 8, 1986 at approximately 7:15. Those witnesses testified, however, that the person they saw was wearing a dark jacket with a hood pulled up around his face. Cynthia's body was discovered in her car at the corner of Wenz and Angola Roads in Toledo, Ohio at approximately 7:30 a.m. on March 8, 1986. Montgomery lives approximately one-half mile from that location. Thereafter, at approximately 12:00 noon on March 8, 1986, Montgomery, Heard and two friends, Sidney Armstead and Eric Wilson, got together to go to a mall. Montgomery, however, was carrying a plastic bag and directed Armstead to first drive him to a dry cleaner. Armstead drove Montgomery to One Hour Martinizing where Montgomery got out of the car with the bag. Although they were unable to identify Montgomery, employees of the laundry testified that on March 8, 1986, a black male showed them a soaking wet dark blue pin-striped suit jacket that he wanted cleaned in one hour. The employees explained that the jacket would have to dry out before it could be cleaned. They then hung the jacket to dry. One employee testified that as it dried, the jacket made a “brownish dripping mess on the floor.” She further testified that the jacket was badly stained and that she had to clean the jacket three times using a chemical cleaner. She could not identify, however, what the stains were. Subsequently, the jacket was picked up. Several days later, police officers obtained the jacket from Randolph Randleman who identified the jacket in court as the one which he had loaned to Montgomery. As stated above, on March 8, 1986 at approximately 7:30 a.m., Cynthia Tincher's body was discovered in her car at the corner of Wenz and Angola. Soon thereafter, Debra Ogle was listed as missing. The following day, however, Debra's car was discovered behind an abandoned house at 1031 Norwood.   Thereafter, on March 10, 1986, Crime Stoppers received a telephone call from a Michael Clark who was at that time incarcerated in the Lucas County Jail. Upon interviewing Clark, officers obtained the name of Glover Heard.Officers located Heard and from Heard they obtained the name of Montgomery. Officers then gained permission from Montgomery's mother to search her home, where he also lived. That search revealed a black leather jacket with a hood and the manual to the Bursa semi-automatic handgun.   Subsequently, on March 12, 1986, officers went to Randolph Randleman's home in an attempt to locate Montgomery. At approximately 12:00 noon, Montgomery arrived at the home and told officers that he knew the officers were looking for him and he wanted to talk about the homicide. He was then arrested and taken to the police station for questioning. During the interrogation, Montgomery initially stated that Heard had killed both girls with his, Montgomery's, gun. He then changed his story but ultimately admitted that he had gone to the girls' apartment for a ride home. He continued to insist, however, that Heard had killed the girls and that he did not know where Debra Ogle's body was. Finally, however, Montgomery admitted that he might be able to show officers where Debra's body was and stated that it was on Hill Avenue near a market.   Officers then took Montgomery to Hill Avenue and ultimately to a wooded area that he identified as the location. Several officers began searching the area while Sergeant Larry Przeslawski stayed in a patrol vehicle with Montgomery. After the officers searched one wooded area for a few minutes, Montgomery told Sergeant Przeslawski to direct the officers to search a different wooded area. Within five minutes, the officers located the body of Debra Ogle. At the conclusion of the trial, the jury found Montgomery guilty of the aggravated murder of Debra Ogle with the specifications that said action involved the purposeful killing of two or more persons and that Montgomery was the principal offender while attempting to commit aggravated robbery. The jury further found Montgomery guilty of the lesser included offense of murder of Cynthia Tincher. At the conclusion of the mitigation phase, the jury recommended that Montgomery be sentenced to death. The trial court agreed with the jury's recommendation and ordered that Montgomery be executed.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
August 6, 2014 Missouri Melinda Griffin, 24  Michael Worthington executed 
Mindy Griffin, murder victimOn September 29, 1995, Michael Worthington and a friend from work, Jill Morehead, were at his condominium in Lake St. Louis, watching television. At about 4:00 p.m., they left to pick up their paychecks from their employer, a local supermarket. They returned to the condo and had dinner and drinks. They then went to a nightclub where each had three drinks. After about two hours, Worthington and Morehead drove to Jennings where Worthington told Morehead he had to pick up money owed to him by a friend. Worthington testified he actually went to pick up drugs. Morehead stayed in her vehicle, while Worthington was in the house for about 15 minutes. They drove back to his condo where he left Morehead. Morehead left the condo when Worthington did not return after about 45 minutes. Later that night, Worthington saw that the kitchen window was open in the condominium of his neighbor, Melinda "Mindy" Griffin. Worthington had seen Melinda around the condominium complex. He got a razor blade and gloves, and when he returned to her condo, he saw that a bathroom light had been turned on. Worthington cut through the screen. He confronted Melinda in the bedroom. He covered her mouth to stop her screams and strangled her until she became unconscious. Worthington began to rape her and she regained consciousness. Worthington raped Melinda with such force that he bruised the inside of her genitals, tore her external genitals, and made a large, deep tear towards her anus. Melinda fought Worthington, and he beat her and strangled her to death. The wounds on her neck showed that Worthington used a rope or cord in addition to his hands to strangle her. He stole her jewelry, credit cards, mobile phone, keys, and her car. The next morning, September 30, 1995, a police officer pulled Worthington over. Worthington was driving Melinda's car. The officer noticed a woman's items in the car such as make-up and shoes, but the car had not been reported stolen. The next day, October 1, a neighbor discovered Melinda's body. When police arrived, they found the screen in the kitchen window had been cut to gain entry. They found Melinda's body lying bruised, bloody, and naked at the foot of the bed, with a lace stocking draped across it. All the bedroom drawers had been pulled open. DNA testing later established that semen found on Melinda's body came from Worthington. Police officers found Worthington that evening, but when he saw the police, he pulled out a knife, held it to his throat, and threatened to commit suicide. Police officers convinced him to put the knife down and brought him into custody. Worthington was wearing a fanny pack containing jewelry and keys belonging to Melinda. At the police station, Worthington relayed his story of four days of drinking and getting high. After being presented with the evidence against him, Worthington confessed to the killing but could not remember the details since, he said, he was prone to blackouts when using alcohol and cocaine. At the time the offenses occurred, Worthington said he was extremely high on Prozac, cocaine, marijuana, and alcohol. Worthington also said that two friends, Darick and Anthony, helped him with the burglary. However, this story was inconsistent with the physical evidence and with subsequent statements made by Worthington. Worthington pleaded guilty to the crimes charged. The judge imposed the death penalty for the murder conviction, as well as the prison terms for the other offenses.  UPDATE: Mindy Griffin's parents witnessed the execution, and the next day visited her grave. Her mother, Carol Angelbeck said she hoped not to have to deal with the murderer's name or think about him anymore. "I think we are going to be able to live a different life now.  I'll always have Mindy in my heart and she'll always be with us every day but I won't have to think about Michael Worthington."  Both Carol and her husband Jack want to focus on the good memories of their daughter Mindy.  They said she loved school and was a good student and was about to graduate with a degree in finance. She was passionate about raising and driving Clydesdale horses. Her parents still raise them in her honor.  Following Worthington’s execution, the couple offer their thanks to Governor Jay Nixon, Attorney General Chris Koster and Department of Corrections Director George Lombardi “I do think that they are following the laws of Missouri and that they are helping victims,” says Carol.
 
Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
August 6, 2014 Texas Juanita Ybarra, 51  Manuel Vasquez stayed
On the morning of March 19, 1998, Manuel Vasquez, a member of the Mexican Mafia, together with Johnny Joe Cruz and Oligario Lujan, forcefully entered the motel room of Juanita Ybarra. Ybarra was present, as was Moses Bazan. Vasquez, Cruz, and Lujan proceeded to attack Bazan and Ybarra. Bazan was assaulted until he lost consciousness. Ybarra was strangled to death, after which her motel room was searched for valuables. The robbery and murder were motivated by Ybarra’s failure to pay the Mexican Mafia’s “dime” tax, consisting of 10% of the proceeds of Ybarra’s sale of illegal drugs.  


Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
August 20, 2014 Pennsylvania Jean Heck, 78 Patrick Stollar stayed 
Seventy-eight-year-old Jean Heck was found by her neighbors lying dead in a pool of blood in her house in Upper St. Clair Township, on June 4, 2003. She had been beaten, strangled, stomped upon, and stabbed. Prior to the discovery of Jean’s body, one of the neighbors saw a man leave her house and drive away in a newer model vehicle. The neighbor later identified this individual in a police photo array as Patrick Jason Stollar. After police investigators arrived on the scene, they discovered that Ms. Heck’s purses did not contain any cash, credit cards, identification, or checkbooks and that they appeared to have been rifled through. The police also discovered a piece of paper on the kitchen counter that had written upon it an address and telephone number, which were shortly determined to be the address and telephone number of Stollar’s mother. It was later discovered that during the time the police were investigating the scene at the victim’s house on June 4, 2003, Stollar was at his bank unsuccessfully attempting to cash a check drawn from Jean Heck’s account, purportedly executed by Jean, and made payable to him in the amount of $4,000. The next day, Stollar attempted to cash a second check drawn from Jean’s account, again purportedly executed by her, and made payable to him in the amount of $2,500. Based upon the address discovered at the scene and other evidence, the police searched for Stollar at his former place of employment, where a co-employee informed the police that Stollar was staying at her apartment with her and her then-fiancÚ. The co-employee signed a consent form for the police to search the apartment. Upon arriving at the apartment, the police observed Stollar running toward the bathroom and attempting to hide. The police told him that they wished to speak with him in the hallway. Stollar consented, and upon reaching the hallway, he suddenly declaimed, “I killed that woman, I murdered that woman.” After Stollar was arrested for the murder of Ms. Heck and given his Miranda warnings, he voluntarily made a statement to the police, which was taped. In this statement, Stollar confessed to the murder, providing details of the crime and further telling the police that he had gone to the victim’s house with the intent of robbing and killing her. Stollar additionally told the police that he had buried the clothing he had worn during the crime, the knife he had used to stab the victim, and certain items he had stolen from the victim’s purses. On June 6, 2003, Stollar took the police to the site where he had buried the aforementioned items. At the site, the police recovered the knife used to stab the victim, blood-spattered clothing, blood-covered tissues that corroborated Stollar’s statement that he had wiped blood from the knife with tissues taken from the victim’s house, the victim’s checkbook, a wallet containing the victim’s driver’s license, and several credit cards that belonged to the victim. Later, Stollar provided another taped confession to the police that corroborated his earlier statements.  


Date of scheduled execution State Victim name Inmate name Status
August 21, 2014 Pennsylvania Kathy Leibig  Glenn Lyons stayed 
On the evening of May 1, 2008 in Berks County, Pennsylvania, Kathy Leibig's husband returned home from work to find her missing, and, when she did not return by morning, he reported her disappearance to police. In the ensuing investigation, officers reviewed Kathy's mobile telephone records, discovering over 100 calls, including her most recent call, between her mobile telephone and two numbers registered to Glenn Lyons. The officers sought to contact Lyons via telephone and at his Reading apartment concerning Kathy's whereabouts, but to no avail. Subsequently, on May 4, 2008, a bystander spotted Kathy's car in a Berks County parking lot. Her husband rushed to the scene, where he discovered her body in the bloodied cabin of her car, naked from the waist down and apparently dead from numerous stab wounds to her head and upper body. Officers processed the crime scene, taking numerous photographs depicting the area, the car, and the location and position of the body, prepared various items for forensic testing, and recovered two broken kitchen knives apparently used in the attack. Later that day, Trooper Thomas Weaver took a statement from Betsy Rupp, who identified herself as Lyons's girlfriend, and who had previously worked with both Kathy and Lyons at a local candy store. Rupp indicated that Kathy and Lyons were involved in a relationship and that, the previous day, Lyons had called her in distress. Rupp told Trooper Weaver that, during the call, she asked why Lyons had not called her, and he responded that he was “on the run” in Northeast Philadelphia, would not be returning to Reading, and that she could have anything she wanted from his apartment. At 11:25 p.m., Trooper James Biever, the lead investigator assigned to the case, sought and obtained a warrant to search Lyons's apartment for evidence related to Kathy's death. In addition to the foregoing facts, Trooper Biever indicated in the affidavit of probable cause in support of his warrant request that he suspected that Lyons had killed Kathy, and that, in his experience, the perpetrators of such gruesome crimes often unwittingly transfer trace evidence to their homes. Id. He further averred that “most residences contain knives.” At approximately 11:42 p.m., Trooper Biever and several other officers executed the warrant, finding Lyons's lights and television were still on, and recovering, inter alia, two kitchen knives from Lyons's dish strainer. Meanwhile, Lyons fled from Reading to Lebanon, where he saw Justin Grube dealing drugs on the street. Lyons asked to buy some cocaine, and Grube indicated he would have to obtain it from the nearby home of a friend. Lyons agreed to that arrangement and, while awaiting Grube's return, he threw a bag into a nearby dumpster, an act which was partially captured on a nearby surveillance camera. That bag was later revealed to contain Kathy's personal effects and a grey, bloodstained sweatshirt. Grube returned with cocaine and, throughout the next several days, Lyons and Grube engaged in a lengthy drug binge that included two trips to the Philadelphia region and numerous visits with Grube's associates. Relevant to Lyons's defense, discussed below, none of the individuals they visited observed him with any scratches, bruises, or other injuries. On May 8, 2008, Lyons was apprehended in Philadelphia and taken into custody at the Pennsylvania State Police–Belmont Barracks, where Trooper Biever and Trooper William Moyer, Jr. interviewed him about Kathy's death. The troopers advised Lyons that they wanted to talk about the crime and advised him of his Miranda rights, and Lyons indicated that, while he wanted to talk about what had happened, he did not want to sign a waiver form because he distrusted police. Lyons explained that, in his view, he had been wrongfully accused and convicted of various crimes in the past. Trooper Biever responded that, in order for them to conduct the interview, he had to be advised of his rights. Thereafter, he reappraised Lyons of those rights, and the officers continued to talk about his distrust of police, but, after approximately 20 minutes, Lyons agreed to waive his Miranda rights in writing. In the ensuing dialogue, Lyons told the officers that, on the morning of Kathy's death, the two had eaten breakfast together and become intimate in Kathy's car, when a man in a yellow hooded sweatshirt opened the door, attacked him, and knocked him out. Lyons claimed that he awoke in his own car, scratched and bruised, and returned to Kathy's car, where he found her lying down with her eyes open. Lyons indicated that he hugged her, kissed her, turned off the car, and blacked out again. He indicated that he had been wearing a grey hooded sweatshirt during the attack and, when asked directly, denied killing Kathy. After listening to Lyons's account, Corporal Moyer indicated that, if there were surveillance tapes at the parking lot, they would not show a man in yellow sweatshirt, and Lyons responded “well, you know what happened” and indicated he was “sticking to his story.” Subsequently, the officers asked him to review his statement for accuracy, but Lyons indicated he would not do so, and invoked his privilege against self-incrimination, terminating the interview.  

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